High Peak Federation

Curriculum A to Z

 

 

In art, craft and design we want our children to be creative and engaged, with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. They should be critical thinkers and develop a deeper understanding of the subject as well as art forms that have shaped our history and culture.


Characteristics of an Artist



  • The ability to use visual language skillfully and convincingly (for example, line, shape, pattern, colour, texture, form) to express emotions, interpret observations, convey insights and accentuate their individuality.

  • The ability to communicate fluently in visual and tactile form.

  • The ability to draw confidently and adventurously from observation, memory and imagination.

  • The ability to explore and invent marks, develop and deconstruct ideas and communicate perceptively and powerfully through purposeful drawing in 2D, 3D or digital media.

  • An impressive knowledge and understanding of other artists, craftmakers and designers.

  • The ability to think and act like creative practitioners by using their knowledge and understanding to inform, inspire and interpret ideas, observations and feelings.

  • Independence, initiative and originality which they can use to develop their creativity.

  • The ability to select and use materials, processes and techniques skillfully and inventively to realise intentions and capitalise on the unexpected.

  • The ability to reflect on, analyse and critically evaluate their own work and that of others.

  • A passion for and a commitment to the subject.



Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • Develop ideas 

  • Master techniques 

  • Take inspiration from the greats 


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:


































































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Develop Ideas



• Respond to ideas and starting points.
• Explore ideas and collect visual information.
• Explore different methods and materials as
ideas develop.



• Develop ideas from starting points
throughout the curriculum.
• Collect information, sketches and resources.
• Adapt and refine ideas as they progress.
• Explore ideas in a variety of ways.
• Comment on artworks using visual language



• Develop and imaginatively extend ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum.
• Collect information, sketches and resources and present ideas imaginatively in a sketch book.
• Use the qualities of materials to enhance ideas.
• Spot the potential in unexpected results as work progresses.
• Comment on artworks with a fluent grasp of visual language.



Master Techniques: Painting



• Use thick and thin brushes.
• Mix primary colours to make secondary.
• Add white to colours to make tints and black
to colours to make tones.
• Create colour wheels.



• Use a number of brush techniques using thick
and thin brushes to produce shapes, textures,
patterns and lines.
• Mix colours effectively.
• Use watercolour paint to produce washes for
backgrounds then add detail.
• Experiment with creating mood with colour



• Sketch (lightly) before painting to combine line and colour.
• Create a colour palette based upon colours observed in the natural or built world.
• Use the qualities of watercolour and acrylic paints to create visually interesting pieces.
• Combine colours, tones and tints to enhance the mood of a piece.
• Use brush techniques and the qualities of paint to create texture.
• Develop a personal style of painting, drawing upon ideas from other artists



Master Techniques: Collage



• Use a combination of materials that are cut,
torn and glued.
• Sort and arrange materials.
• Mix materials to create texture



• Select and arrange materials for a striking
effect.
• Ensure work is precise.
• Use coiling, overlapping, tessellation, mosaic and montage



• Mix textures (rough and smooth, plain and
patterned).
• Combine visual and tactile qualities.
• Use ceramic mosaic materials and techniques



Master Techniques: Sculpture



• Use a combination of shapes.
• Include lines and texture.
• Use rolled up paper, straws, paper, card and clay as materials.
• Use techniques such as rolling, cutting, moulding and carving.



• Create and combine shapes to create
recognisable forms (e.g. shapes made from
nets or solid materials).
• Include texture that conveys feelings,
expression or movement.
• Use clay and other mouldable materials.
• Add materials to provide interesting detail.



• Show life-like qualities and real-life proportions or, if more abstract, provoke different interpretations.
• Use tools to carve and add shapes, texture and pattern.
• Combine visual and tactile qualities.
• Use frameworks (such as wire or moulds) to provide stability and form.



Master Techniques: Drawing



• Draw lines of different sizes and thickness.


• Colour (own work) neatly following the lines.


• Show pattern and texture by adding dots and lines.


• Show different tones by using coloured pencils


 


 


 



• Use different hardnesses of pencils to show line, tone and texture.


• Annotate sketches to explain and elaborate ideas.


• Sketch lightly (no need to use a rubber to correct mistakes).


• Use shading to show light and shadow.


• Use hatching and cross hatching to show tone and texture.


 



• Use a variety of techniques to add interesting effects (e.g. reflections, shadows, direction of sunlight).


• Use a choice of techniques to depict movement, perspective, shadows and reflection.


• Choose a style of drawing suitable for the work (e.g. realistic or impressionistic).


• Use lines to represent movement.


 



Master Techniques: Print



• Use repeating or overlapping shapes.


• Mimic print from the environment (e.g. wallpapers).


• Use objects to create prints (e.g. fruit, vegetables or sponges).


• Press, roll, rub and stamp to make prints.


 



• Use layers of two or more colours.


• Replicate patterns observed in natural or built environments. 


• Make printing blocks (e.g. from coiled string glued to a block).


• Make precise repeating patterns.


 



• Build up layers of colours.


• Create an accurate pattern, showing fine detail.


• Use a range of visual elements to reflect the purpose of the work.


 



Master Techniques: Textiles



• Use weaving to create a pattern.


• Join materials using glue and/or a stitch.


• Use plaiting.


• Use dip dye techniques


 


 



• Shape and stitch materials.


• Use basic cross stitch and back stitch.


• Colour fabric.


• Create weavings.


• Quilt, pad and gather fabric.


 



• Show precision in techniques.


• Choose from a range of stitching techniques.


• Combine previously learned techniques to create pieces.


 



Master Techniques: Digital Media



• Use a wide range of tools to create different textures, lines, tones, colours and shapes.



• Create images, video and sound recordings and explain why they were created.



• Enhance digital media by editing (including sound, video, animation, still images and installations).


 


 



Take inspiration from the greats



• Describe the work of notable artists, artisans and designers.
• Use some of the ideas of artists studied to create pieces



• Replicate some of the techniques used by notable artists, artisans and designers.
• Create original pieces that are influenced by studies of others.



• Give details (including own sketches) about the style of some notable artists, artisans and designers.
• Show how the work of those studied was influential in both society and to other artists.
• Create original pieces that show a range of influences and styles.




Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as an Artist:



  • Wardrobe master

  • Curator

  • Author and illustrator

  • Furniture designer

  • Fashion designer


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Art skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'Art helps me to relax and improves my hand-eye coordination.' Y6 PUPIL


'Art makes me feel more creative in everything.' Y6 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Art on display - Air-raid images.



Whole school art progression - taking inspiration from Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflower painting. 


Year Two and Year Three developing their drawing skills using still life techniques. 



Sett Class have explored collage through our book, Supertato. What an evil pea! 



Receptions and Year One have been developing their drawing skills using thick and thin lines, to create their portraits. 

We want to equip our children with the skills and creativity required to change the world. They must use their Maths, Science and Design Technology skills in order to understand computing systems. We want them to be digitally literate on a range of systems so that they can be active participants in the digital world. Developing digital resilience is a key aspect of the curriculum. Our children need to be equipped to recognise and overcome the challenges of the modern digital world.


Characteristics of a Techie



  • Competence in coding for a variety of practical and inventive purposes, including the application of ideas within other subjects.

  • The ability to connect with others safely and respectfully, understanding the need to act within the law and with moral and ethical integrity.

  • An understanding of the connected nature of devices.

  • The ability to communicate ideas well by using applications and devices throughout the curriculum.

  • The ability to collect, organise and manipulate data effectively.


 


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • To code

  • To connect

  • To communicate

  • To collect


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


Learn how to become digitally resilient with Google's Internet Legends Scheme.


 The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:




































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



To code



• Control motion by specifying the number of steps to travel, direction and turn.


• Add text strings, show and hide objects and change the features of an object.


• Select sounds and control when they are heard, their duration and volume.


• Control when drawings appear and set the pen colour, size and shape.


• Specify user inputs (such as clicks) to control events.


• Specify the nature of events (such as a single event or a loop).


• Create conditions for actions by waiting for a user input (such as responses to questions like: What is your name?).



• Use specified screen coordinates to control movement.


• Set the appearance of objects and create sequences of changes.


• Create and edit sounds. Control when they are heard, their volume, duration and rests.


• Control the shade of pens.


• Specify conditions to trigger events.


• Use IF THEN conditions to control events or objects.


• Create conditions for actions by sensing proximity or by waiting for a user input (such as proximity to a specified colour or a line or responses to questions).


• Use variables to store a value.


• Use the functions define, set, change, show and hide to control the variables.


• Use the Reporter operators


() + ()


() - ()


() * ()


() / ()


to perform calculations.



• Set IF conditions for movements. Specify types of rotation giving the number of degrees.


• Change the position of objects between screen layers (send to back, bring to front).


• Upload sounds from a file and edit them. Add effects such as fade in and out and control their implementation.


• Combine the use of pens with movement to create interesting effects.


• Set events to control other events by ‘broadcasting’ information as a trigger.


• Use IF THEN ELSE conditions to control events or objects.


• Use a range of sensing tools (including proximity, user inputs, loudness and mouse position) to control events or actions.


• Use lists to create a set of variables.


• Use the Boolean operators


() < ()


() = ()


() > ()


()and()


()or()


Not()


to define conditions.


• Use the Reporter operators


() + ()


() - ()


() * ()


() / ()


to perform calculations.


Pick Random () to ()


Join () ()


Letter () of ()


Length of ()


() Mod () This reports the remainder


after a division calculation


Round ()


() of ().



To connect



• Participate in class social media accounts.


• Understand online risks and the age rules for sites.


 



• Contribute to blogs that are moderated by teachers.


• Give examples of the risks posed by online communications.


• Understand the term ‘copyright’.


• Understand that comments made online that are hurtful or offensive are the same as bullying.


• Understand how online services work.


 



• Collaborate with others online on sites approved and moderated by teachers.


• Give examples of the risks of online communities and demonstrate knowledge of how to minimise risk and report problems.


• Understand and demonstrate knowledge that it is illegal to download copyrighted material, including music or games, without express written permission, from the copyright holder.


• Understand the effect of online comments and show responsibility and sensitivity when online.


• Understand how simple networks are set up and used. 


 



To communicate



• Use a range of applications and devices in order to communicate ideas, work and messages.



• Use some of the advanced features of applications and devices in order to communicate ideas, work or messages professionally.



• Choose the most suitable applications and devices for the purposes of communication.


• Use many of the advanced features in order to create high quality, professional or efficient communications.



To collect
 



• Use simple databases to record information in areas across the curriculum.



• Devise and construct databases using applications designed for this purpose in areas across the curriculum.



• Select appropriate applications to devise, construct and manipulate data and present it in an effective and professional manner.



Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Techie:



  • Head of Architecture

  • Building Society Manager

  • Ethical Hacker

  • Cartoonist


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Computing skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'I enjoy using a range of different software and tools to present my work.' Y6 PUPIL


'Being good at word-processing helps me to record my writing and ideas better. I think my IT skills will help me in the future when I'm running my own business.' Y6 PUPIL


'I like to see the results of my coding and how I can control the outcomes.' Y6 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



A joint coding project - coding warning towers with different alarms to indicate natural disasters.




Using Purple Mash to code.

Pupils use their creativity and imagination to design and make products that solve problems in a range of contexts. They draw on the disciplines of other subjects such as: Mathematics, Science, Engineering, Computing and Art. Pupils learn how to take risks - becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. They evaluate notable designers and existing products to inspire them to create their own ideas and designs.


Characteristics of a Designer



  • Significant levels of originality and the willingness to take creative risks to produce innovative ideas and prototypes.

  • An excellent attitude to learning and independent working.

  • The ability to use time efficiently and work constructively and productively with others.

  • The ability to carry out thorough research, show initiative and ask questions to develop an exceptionally detailed knowledge of users’ needs.

  • The ability to act as responsible designers and makers, working ethically, using finite materials carefully and working safely.

  • A thorough knowledge of which tools, equipment and materials to use to make their products.

  • The ability to apply mathematical knowledge.

  • The ability to manage risks exceptionally well to manufacture products safely and hygienically.

  • A passion for the subject and knowledge of, up-to-date technological innovations in materials, products and systems.


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • Master practical skills 

  • Design, make, evaluate and improve 

  • Take inspiration from design throughout history 
     


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:


































































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Master Practical Skills:  Food
 



• Cut, peel or grate ingredients safely and hygienically.


• Measure or weigh using measuring cups or electronic scales.


• Assemble or cook ingredients.


 



• Prepare ingredients hygienically using appropriate utensils.


• Measure ingredients to the nearest gram accurately.


• Follow a recipe.


• Assemble or cook ingredients (controlling the temperature of the oven or hob, if cooking)


 



• Understand the importance of correct storage and handling of ingredients (using knowledge of micro-organisms).


• Measure accurately and calculate ratios of ingredients to scale up or down from a recipe.


• Demonstrate a range of baking and cooking techniques.


• Create and refine recipes, including ingredients, methods, cooking times and temperatures



Master Practical Skills:  Materials



• Cut materials safely using tools provided.


• Measure and mark out to the nearest centimetre.


• Demonstrate a range of cutting and shaping techniques (such as tearing, cutting, folding and curling).


• Demonstrate a range of joining techniques (such as gluing, hinges or combining materials to strengthen)


 



• Cut materials accurately and safely by selecting appropriate tools.


• Measure and mark out to the nearest millimetre.


• Apply appropriate cutting and shaping techniques that include cuts within the perimeter of the material (such as slots or cut outs).


• Select appropriate joining techniques.


 



• Cut materials with precision and refine the finish with appropriate tools (such as sanding wood after cutting or a more precise scissor cut after roughly cutting out a shape).


• Show an understanding of the qualities of materials to choose appropriate tools to cut and shape (such as the nature of fabric may require sharper scissors than would be used to cut paper).


 



Master Practical Skills:  Textiles



• Shape textiles using templates.


• Join textiles using running stitch.


• Colour and decorate textiles using a number of techniques (such as dyeing, adding sequins or printing).


 



• Understand the need for a seam allowance.


• Join textiles with appropriate stitching.


• Select the most appropriate techniques to decorate textiles.


 



• Create objects (such as a cushion) that employ a seam allowance.


• Join textiles with a combination of stitching techniques (such as back stitch for seams and running stitch to attach decoration). 


• Use the qualities of materials to create suitable visual and tactile effects in the decoration of textiles (such as a soft decoration for comfort on a cushion).


 



Master Practical Skills: Electricals and electronics



• Diagnose faults in battery operated devices (such as low battery, water damage or battery terminal damage).



• Create series and parallel circuits



• Create circuits using electronics kits that employ a number of components (such as LEDs, resistors, transistors and chips).



Master Practical Skills:  Computing



• Model designs using software.


 


 



• Control and monitor models using software designed for this purpose.



• Write code to control and monitor models or products.



Master Practical Skills: Construction



Use materials to practise drilling, screwing, gluing and nailing materials to make and strengthen products.


 



• Choose suitable techniques to construct products or to repair items.


• Strengthen materials using suitable techniques.


 



• Develop a range of practical skills to create products (such as cutting, drilling and screwing, nailing, gluing, filing and sanding)



Master Practical Skills: Mechanics



• Create products using levers, wheels and winding mechanisms.


 



• Use scientific knowledge of the transference of forces to choose appropriate mechanisms for a product (such as levers, winding mechanisms, pulleys and gears).



• Convert rotary motion to linear using cams.


• Use innovative combinations of electronics (or computing) and mechanics in product designs


 



Design, make, evaluate and improve



• Design products that have a clear purpose and an intended user.


• Make products, refining the design as work progresses.


• Use software to design.


 



• Design with purpose by identifying opportunities to design.


• Make products by working efficiently (such as by carefully selecting materials).


• Refine work and techniques as work progresses, continually evaluating the product design.


• Use software to design and represent product designs. 


 



• Design with the user in mind, motivated by the service a product will offer (rather than simply for profit).


• Make products through stages of prototypes, making continual refinements.


• Ensure products have a high quality finish, using art skills where appropriate.


• Use prototypes, cross-sectional diagrams and computer aided designs to represent designs. 



Take inspiration from designs throughout history



• Explore objects and designs to identify likes and dislikes of the designs.


• Suggest improvements to existing designs.


• Explore how products have been created.


 



• Identify some of the great designers in all of the areas of study (including pioneers in horticultural techniques) to generate ideas for designs.


• Improve upon existing designs, giving reasons for choices.


• Disassemble products to understand how they work


 



• Combine elements of design from a range of inspirational designers throughout history, giving reasons for choices.


• Create innovative designs that improve upon existing products.


• Evaluate the design of products so as to suggest improvements to the user experience. 


 



 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Designer:



  • Sound engineer

  • Theme park designer

  • Videogames studies researcher 

  • Lego designer

  • Den builder

  • Jewellery designer


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Design skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.  


Pupil Voice


'I enjoy the process of planning, building and seeing a working final product - it is a great sense of accomplishment.' Y6 PUPIL


'We often engage in D & T projects with friends and this helps our teamwork.' Y6 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Collecting awards at Salford University following entries to an Engineering challenge.



Food Technology as part of our Egypt project.

In the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), we believe that every child is unique and strive to provide an enabling environment that is nurturing and inclusive. We believe that all children should celebrate their diversity and embrace differences including culture, ethnicity, religion, language, special educational need, disability, gender or ability. We foster positive relationships in which all children learn to be resilient, independent, confident and self-assured, secure and valued.



In order to be successful, pupils will have the opportunity to learn and develop the characteristics of effective learning by:




  • Playing and exploring - children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; 




  • Active learning - children concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter difficulties, and enjoy achievements; and 




  • Creating and thinking critically - children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things. 




The EYFS curriculum at The High Peak Federation is holistic, broad and balanced. It is accessible for every child and encompasses the three prime areas of learning and four specific areas through varied, fun and exciting learning contexts and opportunities. This looks different in the Autumn term when children need time to settle in and transition from Nursery. The children actively learn through purposeful play in which they are given opportunities to play and explore.  


They then begin to be given challenge activities in all areas of learning. Very quickly we begin to teach fun daily discreet phonics sessions and lots of interactive games in which children can practise their blending and segmenting skills. Phonics is our prime approach to reading and writing.  


We follow the Maths Mastery approach - in which we teach mathematical concepts and key skills through a Concrete, Pictorial, Abstract approach. 


The areas of Learning and Development are: 


Table.png


Children learn and develop well in enabling environments, in which their experiences respond to their individual needs and there is a strong partnership between practitioners and parents and carers. Parents and carers are invited in weekly to share work together with their child. The children look forward to showing off their work and parents and carers love to see their child grow and develop as they move through the early years of their education. Parents are actively encouraged to share achievements from home with Early Years staff through family learning books, learning diary and informally during our drop-in sessions. This gives a holistic picture of each and every child. 


Aspirations for the Future  


We provide the foundations so that our young learners are ready to thrive socially, emotionally, physically and cognitively in the next phase of their education in Key Stage 1 and for life- long learning.  


As the Reception year goes on, we gradually provide increasing opportunities for more formal learning to ensure the children are ready for their next stage of education in Key Stage 1. The areas of learning from the EYFS curriculum dovetail into National Curriculum subjects and links are made to enable children to begin to develop an awareness of the learning and characteristics for each subject. This enable children to make connections in their learning and provides the foundation for vertical accumulation of knowledge, understanding and skills.  


 


Impact 


Assessment 


Through providing a rich variety of opportunities in each of the key skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the year. Their knowledge, skills and understanding are continually observed, celebrated and assessed to identify next steps. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time. This is reported to parents via the EYFS Profile. 


Pupil Voice


'We love coming to school because every day is lots of fun.' Y1 PUPIL


'My teachers are really kind.' REC PUPIL


'I love it when we do Show and Tell on Fridays' REC PUPIL


'I like gardening and I like helping to water the plants and seeds' Y1 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Out exploring away from school.



We change the role-play areas for every new topic.



Getting busy planting.



We promote questions and curiosity.




Caring for our chickens.




Planting sweet peas.

We want our children to be able to speak and write fluently in order to share their ideas and emotions with others. Pupils should read a wide-range of texts for pleasure in order to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, spiritually and socially. This will enable them to communicate confidently and effectively, to allow them to become effective global citizens.


Characteristics of a Reader



  • Excellent phonic knowledge and skills.

  • Fluency and accuracy in reading across a wide range of contexts throughout the curriculum.

  • Knowledge of an extensive and rich vocabulary.

  • An excellent comprehension of texts.

  • The motivation to read for both study and for pleasure.

  • Extensive knowledge through having read a rich and varied range of texts.


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • To understand texts

  • To read words accurately


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:
























Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



To read words accurately



• Apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words.


• Respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes.


• Read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught.


• Read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.


• Read words containing taught GPCs and –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est endings.


• Read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs.


• Read words with contractions (for example, I’m, I’ll, we’ll) and understand that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s).


• Read aloud accurately books that are consistent with phonic knowledge and that do not require other strategies to work out words.


• Re-read these books to build up fluency and confidence in word reading.


• Read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes.


• Read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above.


• Read words containing common suffixes.


• Read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered.


• Read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation.


• Re-read books to build up fluency and confidence in word reading represents the omitted letter(s).


• Read aloud accurately books that are consistent with phonic knowledge and that do not require other strategies to work out words.


• Re-read these books to build up fluency and confidence in word reading.


• Read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes.


• Read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above.


• Read words containing common suffixes.


• Read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered.


• Read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation.


• Re-read books to build up fluency and confidence in word reading.


 



• Apply a growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology).


• Read further exception words, noting the spellings.



• Apply knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes.


• Read age-appropriate books with confidence and fluency (including whole novels).


(Note: this should be through normal reading rather than direct teaching.)



To understand texts 



• Discuss events.


• Predict events.


• Link reading to own experiences and other books.


• Join in with stories or poems.


• Check that reading makes sense and self-correct.


• Infer what characters are like from actions.


• Ask and answer questions about texts.


• Discuss favourite words and phrases.


• Listen to and discuss a wide range of texts.


• Recognise and join in with (including role-play) recurring language.


• Explain and discuss understanding of texts.


• Discuss the significance of the title and events.


• Make inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.



• Draw inferences from reading.


• Predict from details stated and implied.


• Recall and summarise main ideas.


• Discuss words and phrases that capture the imagination.


• Retrieve and record information from non-fiction, using titles, headings, sub-headings and indexes.


• Prepare poems and plays to read aloud with expression, volume, tone and intonation.


• Identify recurring themes and elements of different stories (e.g. good triumphing over evil).


• Recognise some different forms of poetry.


• Explain and discuss understanding of reading, maintaining focus on the topic.


• Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.


• Predict what might happen from details stated and implied.


• Identify main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarise these.


• Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.


• Ask questions to improve understanding of a text.



• Recommend books to peers, giving reasons for choices.


• Identify and discuss themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing.


• Make comparisons within and across books.


• Learn a wide range of poetry by heart.


• Prepare poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience.


• Check that the book makes sense, discussing understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context.


• Ask questions to improve understanding.


• Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.


• Predict what might happen from details stated and implied.


• Summarise the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.


• Identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.


• Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.


• Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.


• Participate in discussion about books, taking turns and listening and responding to what others say.


• Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.


• Provide reasoned justifications for views.



 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Reader and Writer:



  • Publicity Assistant

  • Stage Director

  • Song Writer

  • Entertainment Manager

  • Social Media Consultant

  • Cartoonist


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Reading skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'I like reading stories and am always keen to find out what will happen. Reading enhances my comprehension, reading skills and love of books. I particularly like reading Fantasy Adventure genre.' Y6 PUPIL


'I just love reading Michael Morpurgo stories.' Y2 PUPIL


Examples of Learning 



Reading afternoon with parents invited.

 


Spelling


As part of our Curriculum recovery plans, we have thoroughly analysed gaps in children’s knowledge and skills. Alongside children’s writing stamina across the school being a priority, it is evident that as a school we need to refocus upon spelling and in particular the acquisition of spelling rules and exceptions. Furthermore, we want children to apply their spelling knowledge across the curriculum. Consequently, we are investing in fresh resources.


This term we have introduced a new spelling scheme - No-nonsense spelling. We recognise that spelling can often be an area of the English curriculum that children can struggle with, but have already seen some real progress in spelling for children since introducing the new scheme.


 


Pupil Voice


'We get to practice and learn our spellings in different fun ways. I am good at spelling as a result.' Y6 PUPIL


'If you find spelling more difficult, you get lots of extra help.' Y6 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Classrooms display key vocabulary to help remind children of their spelling.



Children receive lots of small group differentiated support for spellings.

We want our children to develop a love for the written word. Through cross-curricular writing, the children will write fluently, with interesting details, varied sentence structures and sophisticated vocabulary.They will value the importance of handwriting, accurate spelling and correct punctuation. They will be able to articulate the key characteristics of a writer and champion these throughout all subjects. By doing this, they will unlock the world around them and develop socially, emotionally, spiritually and culturally.


Characteristics of a Writer



  • The ability to write fluently and with interesting detail on a number of topics throughout the curriculum.

  • A vivid imagination which makes readers engage with and enjoy their writing.

  • A highly developed vocabulary and an excellent knowledge of writing techniques to extend details or description.

  • Well-organised and structured writing, which includes a variety of sentence structures.

  • Excellent transcription skills that ensure their writing is well presented and punctuated, spelled correctly and neat.

  • A love of writing and an appreciation of its educational, cultural and entertainment values.


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • To present neatly

  • To spell correctly

  • To punctuate accurately

  • To use sentences appropriately

  • To write with purpose

  • To use imaginative description

  • To organise writing appropriately

  • To use paragraphs

  • To analyse writing

  • To present writing


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:








































































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



To write with purpose



• Say first and then write to tell others about ideas.


 


• Write for a variety of purposes.


 


• Plan by talking about ideas and writing notes.


 


• Use some of the characteristic features of the type of writing used.


 


• Write, review and improve.



• Use the main features of a type of writing (identified in reading).


 


• Use techniques used by authors to create characters and settings.


 


• Compose and rehearse sentences orally.


 


• Plan, write, edit and improve.



• Identify the audience for writing.


• Choose the appropriate form of writing using the main features identified in reading. 


• Note, develop and research ideas.


• Plan, draft, write, edit and improve.


 



To use imaginative description



• Use well-chosen adjectives to add detail. 


• Use names of people, places and things.


• Use well-chosen adjectives.


• Use nouns and pronouns for variety.


• Use adverbs for extra detail.


 



• Create characters, settings and plots.


• Use alliteration effectively.


• Use similes effectively.


• Use a range of descriptive phrases including some collective nouns. 


 


 



• Use the techniques that authors use to create characters, settings and plots.


• Create vivid images by using alliteration, similes, metaphors and personification.


• Interweave descriptions of characters, settings and atmosphere with dialogue.


 



To organise writing appropriately



• Re-read writing to check it makes sense.


• Use the correct tenses.


• Organise writing in line with its purpose. 


 



• Use organisational devices such as headings and sub headings.


• Use the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause. 


• Use connectives that signal time, shift attention, inject suspense and shift the setting.


 



• Guide the reader by using a range of organisational devices, including a range of connectives.


• Choose effective grammar and punctuation.


• Ensure correct use of tenses throughout a piece of writing.


 



To use paragraphs



• Write about more than one idea.


• Group related information.


 



• Organise paragraphs around a theme.


• Sequence paragraphs.


 



• Write paragraphs that give the reader a sense of clarity.


• Write paragraphs that make sense if read alone.


• Write cohesively at length.


 



To use sentences appropriately



• Write so that other people can understand the meaning of sentences.


• Sequence sentences to form clear narratives.


• Convey ideas sentence by sentence.


• Join sentences with conjunctions and connectives.


• Vary the way sentences begin. 


 



• Use a mixture of simple, compound and complex sentences.


• Write sentences that include:


      • conjunctions


      • adverbs


      • direct speech, punctuated correctly


      • clauses


      • adverbial phrases.


 



• Write sentences that include: 


      • relative clauses


      • modal verbs


      • relative pronouns


      • brackets


      • parenthesis


      • a mixture of active and passive voice


      • a clear subject and object


      • hyphens, colons and semi colons


      • bullet points. 


 



To present neatly



• Sit correctly and hold a pencil correctly.  


• Begin to form lower-case letters correctly.


• Form capital letters.


• Form digits 0-9.


• Understand letters that are formed in similar ways. 


• Form lower-case letters of a consistent size.


• Begin to join some letters. 


• Write capital letters and digits of consistent size. 


• Use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.


 



• Join letters, deciding which letters are best left un-joined.


• Make handwriting legible by ensuring downstrokes of letters are parallel and letters are spaced appropriately.


 


 



• Write fluently and legibly with a personal style.


 



To spell correctly



• Spell words containing 40+ learned phonemes.


• Spell common exception words (the, said, one, two and the days of the week).


• Name letters of the alphabet in order. 


• Use letter names to describe spellings of words.


• Add prefixes and suffixes, learning the rule for adding s and es as a plural marker for nouns, and the third person singular marker for verbs (I drink - he drinks).


• Use the prefix un.


• Use suffixes where no change to the spelling of the root word is needed: helping, helped, helper, eating, quicker, quickest.


• Use spelling rules.


• Write simple sentences dictated by the teacher.


• Spell by segmenting words into phonemes and represent them with the correct graphemes.


• Learn some new ways to represent phonemes.


• Spell common exception words correctly.


• Spell contraction words correctly (can’t, don’t).


• Add suffixes to spell longer words (-ment, -ness, -ful and -less).


• Use the possessive apostrophe. (singular) (for example, the girl's book)


• Distinguish between homophones and near-homophones. 


 



• Use prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them. 


• Spell homophones correctly.


• Spell correctly often misspelt words. 


• Place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals (for example, girls’, boys’) and in words with irregular plurals (for example, children’s).


• Use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary.


• Write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.


 



• Use prefixes appropriately.


• Spell some words with silent letters (knight, psalm and solemn).


• Distinguish between homophones and other words that are often confused.


• Use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and understand that some words need to be learned specifically. 


• Use dictionaries to check spelling and meaning of words. 


• Use the first three or four letters of a word to look up the meaning or spelling of words in a dictionary.


• Use a thesaurus.


• Spell the vast majority of words correctly.


 



To punctuate accurately



• Leave spaces between words. 


• Use the word ‘and’ to join words and sentences.


• Begin to punctuate using a capital letter for the name of people, places, the days of the week and I.


• Use both familiar and new punctuation correctly, including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, question marks, commas for lists and apostrophes for contracted forms.


• Use sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation and command.


• Use extended noun phrases to describe and specify (e.g. the blue butterfly).


• Use subordination (when, if, that or because).


• Use coordination (or, and, but).


• Use some features of standard written English.


• Use the present and past tenses correctly, including the progressive form.


 



• Develop understanding of writing concepts by: 


    • Extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although. 


   • Using the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense.


   • Choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition. 


   • Using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause. 


   • Using fronted adverbials.


• Indicate grammatical and other features by:


   • Using commas after fronted adverbials.


   • Indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe with plural nouns.


   • Using and punctuating direct speech.


 



• Develop understanding of writing concepts by: 


   • Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms. 


   • Using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence.


   • Using the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause. 


   • Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely. 


   • Using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility. 


   • Using relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that or with an implied (i.e. omitted) relative pronoun.


• Indicate grammatical and other features by:


   • Using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing. 


   • Using hyphens to avoid ambiguity. 


   • Using brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis. 


   • Using semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses. 


   • Using a colon to introduce a list. 


   • Punctuating bullet points consistently.


 



To analyse writing



• Discuss writing with the teacher and other pupils.


• Use and understand grammatical terminology in discussing writing:


Year 1


   • word, sentence, letter, capital letter, full stop, punctuation, singular, plural, question mark, exclamation mark.


Year 2


• Use and understand grammatical terminology in discussing writing:


   • verb, tense (past, present), adjective, noun, suffix, apostrophe, comma.


 



• Use and understand grammatical terminology when discussing writing and reading:


 Year 3


   • word family, conjunction, adverb, preposition, direct speech, inverted commas (or ‘speech marks’), prefix, consonant, vowel, clause, subordinate clause.


 Year 4


   • pronoun, possessive pronoun, adverbial.



• Use and understand grammatical terminology when discussing writing and reading:


 Year 5


    • relative clause, modal verb, relative pronoun, parenthesis, bracket, dash, determiner, cohesion, ambiguity.


 Year 6


    • active and passive voice, subject and object, hyphen, synonym, colon, semi-colon, bullet points.



To present writing



• Read aloud writing clearly enough to be heard by peers and the teacher.


• Read aloud writing with some intonation.


 



• Read aloud writing to a group or whole class, using appropriate intonation.



• Perform compositions, using appropriate intonation and volume.



 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Reader and Writer:



  • Publicity Assistant

  • Stage Director

  • Song Writer

  • Entertainment Manager

  • Social Media Consultant

  • Cartoonist


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Writing skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.  


Pupil Voice


'My writing has improved as I've added lots of sophisticated vocabulary - this has helped me become a more confident speaker too.' Y6 PUPIL


'We are given lots of time to continually edit and improve our writing, so it is the best it can be.' Y6 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



World War II shape poems.



We generate and share important vocabulary for every new topic and then 'magpie' this for our own writing.



Remembrance poetry.




We use class displays as a working wall.



Extended writing in 'final draft' form.

We want our children to be fascinated about the world and the people in it. Their curiosity should last for the rest of their lives. Our children should know about the diversity of places, people and natural and human environments. They should also understand physical and human processes of the planet and how the world is changing too.


Characteristics of a Geographer



  • An excellent knowledge of where places are and what they are like.

  • An excellent understanding of the ways in which places are interdependent and interconnected and how much human and physical environments are interrelated.

  • An extensive base of geographical knowledge and vocabulary.

  • Fluency in complex, geographical enquiry and the ability to apply questioning skills and use effective analytical and presentational techniques.

  • The ability to reach clear conclusions and develop a reasoned argument to explain findings.

  • Significant levels of originality, imagination or creativity as shown in interpretations and representations of the subject matter.

  • Highly developed and frequently utilised fieldwork and other geographical skills and techniques.

  • A passion for and commitment to the subject, and a real sense of curiosity to find out about the world and the people who live there.

  • The ability to express well-balanced opinions, rooted in very good knowledge and understanding about current and contemporary issues in society and the environment.


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • Investigate places

  • Investigate patterns

  • Communicate geographically 


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:






























Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Investigate places



 Ask and answer geographical questions (such as: What is this place like? What or who will I see in this place? What do people do in this place?).


• Identify the key features of a location in order to say whether it is a city, town, village, coastal or rural area.


• Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied.


• Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of the school and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.


• Use aerial images and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic physical features.


• Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.


• Name and locate the world’s continents and oceans.



• Ask and answer geographical questions about the physical and human characteristics of a location.


• Explain own views about locations, giving reasons.


• Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features.


• Use fieldwork to observe and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies.


• Use a range of resources to identify the key physical and human features of a location. 


• Name and locate counties and cities of the United 


Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, cities, rivers, key topographical features and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time. 


• Name and locate the countries of Europe and identify their main physical and human characteristics.



• Collect and analyse statistics and other information in order to draw clear conclusions about locations.


• Identify and describe how the physical features affect the human activity within a location.


• Use a range of geographical resources to give detailed descriptions and opinions of the characteristic features of a location.


• Use different types of fieldwork sampling (random and systematic) to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area. Record the results in a range of ways. 


• Analyse and give views on the effectiveness of different geographical representations of a location (such as aerial images compared with maps and topological maps - as in London’s Tube map).


• Name and locate some of the countries and cities of the world and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, rivers, key topographical features and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.


• Name and locate the countries of North and South America and identify their main physical and human characteristics.



Investigate patterns



 Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom and of a contrasting non-European country.


• Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles. 


• Identify land use around the school.



• Name and locate the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle and date time zones. Describe some of the characteristics of these geographical areas.


• Describe geographical similarities and differences between countries.


• Describe how the locality of the school has changed over time. 



• Identify and describe the geographical significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, and time zones (including day and night).


• Understand some of the reasons for geographical similarities and differences between countries.


• Describe how locations around the world are changing and explain some of the reasons for change.


• Describe geographical diversity across the world.


• Describe how countries and geographical regions are interconnected and interdependent.



Communicate geographically



 Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to: 


• key physical features, including: beach, coast, forest, hill, mountain, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation and weather. 


• key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office and shop.


• Use compass directions (north, south, east and west) and locational language (e.g. near and far) to describe the location of features and routes on a map.


• Devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key. Use simple grid references (A1, B1).



• Describe key aspects of: 


• physical geography, including: rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes and the water cycle. 


• human geography, including: settlements and land use.


• Use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and key to communicate knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.



• Describe and understand key aspects of: 


• physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes and the water cycle. 


• human geography, including: settlements, land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals, and water supplies.


• Use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and a key (that uses standard Ordnance Survey symbols) to communicate knowledge of the United Kingdom and the world.


• Create maps of locations identifying patterns (such as: land use, climate zones, population densities, height of land).



 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs. 


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Geographer:
· Marine Biologist
· Helicopter Mission Controller
· Forester
· Farmer


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Geography skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'Not all learning is in the classroom. In our recent topic, we got out and about in New Mills to further develop our Geography knowledge. We had a visit from Severn Trent Water and this really helped us to understand river systems better.' Y6 PUPIL


'We try to find different countries around the world by using clues - this is lots of fun.' Y4 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



River profile models.



Local study of New Mills.




Researching European capital cities.



We want our children to gain a coherent understanding of Britain's past and that of the wider world. Our language rich curriculum should inspire children's curiosity to know more about the past. Children should ask perceptive questions and think critically using sources of evidence to support their opinion. they should understand how people's lives have changed, how diverse societies were, and the challenges that were faced.


Characteristics of a Historian




  • An excellent knowledge and understanding of people, events, and contexts from a range of historical periods and of historical concepts and processes.



  • The ability to think critically about history and communicate ideas very confidently in styles appropriate to a range of audiences.



  • The ability to consistently support, evaluate and challenge their own and others’ views using detailed, appropriate and accurate historical evidence derived from a range of sources.



  • The ability to think, reflect, debate, discuss and evaluate the past, formulating and refining questions and lines of enquiry. 



  • A passion for history and an enthusiastic engagement in learning, which develops their sense of curiosity about the past and their understanding of how and why people interpret the past in different ways. 



  • A respect for historical evidence and the ability to make robust and critical use of it to support their explanations and judgments.



  • A desire to embrace challenging activities, including opportunities to undertake high-quality research across a range of history topics.



Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:


  • Investigate and interpret the past 

  • Build an overview of world history 

  • Understand chronology 

  • Communicate historically 


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:




































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Investigate and interpret the past



Observe or handle evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past.


• Ask questions such as: What was it like for people? What happened? How long ago?


• Use artefacts, pictures, stories, online sources and databases to find out about the past.


• Identify some of the different ways the past has been represented.


 



• Use evidence to ask questions and find answers to questions about the past.


• Suggest suitable sources of evidence for historical enquiries.


• Use more than one source of evidence for historical enquiry in order to gain a more accurate understanding of history.


• Describe different accounts of a historical event, explaining some of the reasons why the accounts may differ.


• Suggest causes and consequences of some of the main events and changes in history.


 



• Use sources of evidence to deduce information about the past.


• Select suitable sources of evidence, giving reasons for choices.


• Use sources of information to form testable hypotheses about the past.


• Seek out and analyse a wide range of evidence in order to justify claims about the past.


• Show an awareness of the concept of propaganda and how historians must understand the social context of evidence studied.


• Understand that no single source of evidence gives the full answer to questions about the past.


• Refine lines of enquiry as appropriate.


 



Build an overview of world history 



• Describe historical events.


• Describe significant people from the past.


• Recognise that there are reasons why people in the past acted as they did.


 



• Describe changes that have happened in the locality of the school throughout history.


• Give a broad overview of life in Britain from ancient until medieval times.


• Compare some of the times studied with those of other areas of interest around the world.


• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.


• Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.


 



• Identify continuity and change in the history of the locality of the school.


• Give a broad overview of life in Britain from medieval until the Tudor and Stuarts times.


• Compare some of the times studied with those of the other areas of interest around the world. 


• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural or religious diversity of past society.


• Describe the characteristic features of the past, including ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children.


 



Understand chronology



• Place events and artefacts in order on a time line.


• Label time lines with words or phrases such as: past, present, older and newer.


• Recount changes that have occurred in their own lives.


• Use dates where appropriate.


 



• Place events, artefacts and historical figures on a time line using dates.


• Understand the concept of change over time, representing this, along with evidence, on a time line.


• Use dates and terms to describe events.


 



• Describe the main changes in a period of history (using terms such as: social, religious, political, technological and cultural).


• Identify periods of rapid change in history and contrast them with times of relatively little change.


• Understand the concepts of continuity and change over time, representing them, along with evidence, on a time line.


• Use dates and terms accurately in describing events.


 



Communicate historically



• Use words and phrases such as: a long time ago, recently, when my parents/carers were children, years, decades and centuries to describe the passing of time.


• Show an understanding of the concept of nation and a nation’s history.


• Show an understanding of concepts such as civilisation, monarchy, parliament, democracy, and war and peace.


 



• Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including: 


    • dates 


    • time period 


    • era 


    • change 


    • chronology.


• Use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to a good standard in order to communicate information about the past.


 



• Use appropriate historical vocabulary to communicate, including: 


    • dates 


    • time period 


    • era 


    • chronology 


    • continuity 


    • change 


    • century 


    • decade 


    • legacy.


• Use literacy, numeracy and computing skills to an exceptional standard in order to communicate information about the past.


• Use original ways to present information and ideas.


 



 


 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs. 

Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Historian:


  • Member of Parliament

  • Curator

  • Publicity Assistant

  • Tour Guide


For more careers, please visit First Careers.

 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the History skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   



Pupil Voice


'We've just been finding out about our family trees and this helped me improve my knowledge about my background and where I'm from. I've learnt a lot about myself I didn't know before.' Y5 PUPIL


'I really enjoy school visits linked to our History learning - we've been to Manchester Museum and Stockport Air Raid shelter.' Y6 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Evacuues day.



World War II learning on display.

We strive for our children to be successful and proficient mathematicians who can solve problems, fluently recall facts rapidly and reason mathematically while justifying their reasoning. This will provide them with the essential life skills required to be financially capable while understanding and contributing to the world around them. It will allow them to create solutions to problems in a range of settings. Successful pupils should display curiosity, resourcefulness, determination, flexibility and bravery within Mathematics too.


Characteristics of a Mathematician



  • An understanding of the important concepts and an ability to make connections within mathematics.

  • A broad range of skills in using and applying mathematics.

  • Fluent knowledge and recall of number facts and the number system.

  • The ability to show initiative in solving problems in a wide range of contexts, including the new or unusual.

  • The ability to think independently and to persevere when faced with challenges, showing a confidence of success.

  • The ability to embrace the value of learning from mistakes and false starts.

  • The ability to reason, generalise and make sense of solutions.

  • Fluency in performing written and mental calculations and mathematical techniques.

  • A wide range of mathematical vocabulary.

  • A commitment to and passion for the subject. 


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • Know and use numbers 

  • Add and subtract 

  • Multiply and divide 

  • Use fractions 

  • Understand the properties of shapes 

  • Describe position, direction and movement 

  • Use measures 

  • Use statistics 

  • Use algebra 


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:




















































































































































Threshold Concept


 

Milestone 1



Milestone 2



Milestone 3



Know and use numbers
 



Counting



• Count to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number.


• Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals.


• Given a number, identify one more and one less.


• Count in steps of 2, 3, 5 and 10 from 0 or 1 and in tens from any number, forward and backward.



• Count in multiples of 2 to 9, 25, 50, 100 and 1000.


• Find 1000 more or less than a given number.


• Count backwards through zero to include negative numbers.



• Read numbers up to 10 000 000.


• Use negative numbers in context and calculate intervals across zero.



Representing



• Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations, including the number line.


• Read and write numbers initially from 1 to 20 and then to at least 100 in numerals and in words.



• Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations.


• Read Roman numerals to 100 (I to C) and know that over time, the numeral system changed to include the concept of zero and place value.



• Write numbers up to 10 000 000


• Read Roman numerals to 1000 (M) and recognise years written in Roman numerals.



Comparing



• Use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most and least.


• Compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use <, > and = signs.



• Order and compare numbers beyond 1000.



• Order and compare numbers up to 10 000 000.



Place value



• Recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (tens, ones).



• Recognise the place value of each digit in a four-digit number. (thousands, hundreds, tens, and ones)


• Round any number to the nearest 10, 100 or 1000.



• Round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy.


• Determine the value of each digit in any number.



Solving problems



• Use place value and number facts to solve problems.



• Solve number and practical problems with increasingly large positive numbers.



• Solve number and practical problems.



Add and subtract
 



Complexity



• Solve one-step problems with addition and subtraction:


• Using concrete objects and pictorial representations including those involving numbers, quantities and measures.


• Using the addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs.


• Applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods.



• Solve two-step addition and subtraction problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.



• Solve multi-step addition and subtraction problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.



Methods



• Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including:


• One-digit and two-digit numbers to 20, including zero.


• A two-digit number and ones.


• A two-digit number and tens.


• Two two-digit numbers.


• Adding three one-digit numbers.


• Show that addition of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another cannot.



• Add and subtract numbers with up to 4 digits using the formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction where appropriate.


• Add and subtract numbers mentally, including:


• A three-digit number and ones.


• A three-digit number and tens.


• A three-digit number and hundreds.



• Add and subtract whole numbers with more than 4 digits, including using formal written methods. (columnar addition and subtraction)


• Add and subtract numbers mentally with increasingly large numbers.



Checking



• Recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems.



• Estimate and use inverse operations to check answers to a calculation.



• Use rounding to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, levels of accuracy.



Using number facts



• Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20.


• Recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100.



• Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value and more complex addition and subtraction.



• Add and subtract negative integers.



Multiply and divide
 



Complexity



• Solve one-step (two-step at greater depth) problems involving multiplication and division.



• Solve problems involving multiplying and dividing, including using the distributive law to multiply two digit numbers by one digit, integer scaling problems and harder correspondence problems (such as n objects are connected to m objects).



• Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division and a combination of these, including understanding the meaning of the equals sign.


• Solve problems involving multiplication and division, including scaling by simple fractions and problems involving simple rates.


• Use knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations involving the four operations.



Methods



• Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (x), division (÷) and equals (=) signs.


• Show that multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot.


• Solve problems involving multiplication and division using mental methods.



• Multiply two-digit and three-digit numbers by a one-digit number using formal written layout.


• Use place value, known and derived facts to multiply and divide mentally, including: multiplying by 0 and 1; dividing by 1; multiplying together three numbers.


• Recognise and use factor pairs and commutativity in mental calculations.



• Multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long multiplication.


• Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding, as appropriate for the context.


• Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit number using the formal written method of short division where appropriate, interpreting remainders according to the context.


• Perform mental calculations, including with mixed operations and large numbers.



Checking



• Use known multiplication facts to check the accuracy of calculations.



• Recognise and use the inverse relationship between multiplication and division and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems.



• Estimate and use inverse operations and rounding to check answers to a calculation.



Using multiplication and division facts



• Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables.


• Recognise odd and even numbers.


• Use multiplication and division facts to solve problems.



• Recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12.



• Identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers.


• Establish whether a number up to 100 is prime and recall prime numbers up to 19.


• Multiply and divide whole numbers and those involving decimals by 10, 100 and 1000.


• Recognise and use square numbers and cube numbers, and the notation for squared (2) and cubed (3).


• Solve problems involving multiplication and division including using knowledge of factors and multiples, squares and cubes.



Fractions
 



Recognising fractions



• Recognise, find and name a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.


• Recognise, find and name a quarter as one of four equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.


• Recognise, find, name and write fractions 1/2, 1/4, 2/4 and 3/4 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity.



• Recognise, find and write fractions of a discrete set of objects: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.


• Recognise and use fractions as numbers: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.


• Round decimals with one decimal place to the nearest whole number.


• Compare numbers with the same number of decimal places up to two decimal places.


• Count up and down in tenths; recognise that tenths arise from dividing an object into 10 equal parts and in dividing one-digit numbers or quantities by 10.


• Count up and down in hundredths; recognise that hundredths arise when dividing an object by one hundred and dividing tenths by ten.


• Compare and order unit fractions and fractions with the same denominators.



• Compare and order fractions whose denominators are all multiples of the same number.


• Compare and order fractions, including fractions > 1.


• Recognise mixed numbers and improper fractions and convert from one form to the other and write mathematical statements > 1 as a mixed number.


• Round decimals with two decimal places to the nearest whole number and to one decimal place.


• Read, write, order and compare numbers with up to three decimal places.


• Identify the value of each digit in numbers given to three decimal places.


• Solve problems involving number up to three decimal places.


• Recognise the percent symbol (%) and understand that percent relates to ‘number of parts per hundred’, and write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100, and as a decimal.



Equivalence



• Recognise the equivalence of 2/4 and 1/2.



• Recognise and show, using diagrams, families of common equivalent fractions.


• Recognise and write decimal equivalents of any number of tenths or hundredths.


• Recognise and write decimal equivalents to 1/4, 1/2, 3/4.



• Identify, name and write equivalent fractions of a given fraction, represented visually, including tenths and hundredths.


• Read and write decimal numbers as fractions.


• Recognise and use thousandths and relate them to tenths, hundredths and decimal equivalents.


• Use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination.


• Associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents.


• Recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts.



Solving problems



• Write simple fractions for example, 1/2 of 6 = 3.



• Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator within one whole.


• Solve problems involving increasingly harder fractions.


• Calculate quantities and fractions to divide quantities (including non-unit fractions where the answer is a whole number).


• Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator.


• Find the effect of dividing a one- or two-digit number by 10 and 100, identifying the value of the digits in the answer as ones, tenths and hundredths.


• Solve simple measure and money problems involving fractions and decimals to two decimal places.



• Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator and denominators that are multiples of the same number.


• Add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions.


• Multiply proper fractions and mixed numbers by whole numbers, supported by materials and diagrams.


• Multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form.


• Solve problems which require knowing percentage and decimal equivalents of, 1/2, 1/4, 1/5, 2/5, 4/5 and those fractions with a denominator of a multiple of 10 or 25.


• Divide proper fractions by whole numbers.


• Multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 giving answers up to three decimal places.


 


Ratio and proportion


• Solve problems involving the relative sizes of two quantities where missing values can be found by using integer multiplication and division facts.


• Solve problems involving the calculation of percentages and the use of percentages for comparison.


• Solve problems involving similar shapes where the scale factor is known or can be found.


• Solve problems involving unequal sharing and grouping using knowledge of fractions and multiples.



Understand the properties of shapes
 


 

• Recognise and name common 2D and 3D shapes.


• Identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line.


• Identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces.


• Identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes.


• Compare and sort common 2-D and 3-D shapes and everyday objects.



• Draw 2-D shapes and make 3-D shapes using modelling materials; recognise 3-D shapes in different orientations and describe them.


• Recognise angles as a property of shape or a description of a turn.


• Identify right angles, recognise that two right angles make a half-turn, three make three quarters of a turn and four a complete turn; identify whether angles are greater than or less than a right angle.


• Identify horizontal and vertical lines and pairs of perpendicular and parallel lines.


• Compare and classify geometric shapes, including quadrilaterals and triangles, based on their properties and sizes.


• Identify acute and obtuse angles and compare and order angles up to two right angles by size.


• Identify lines of symmetry in 2-D shapes presented in different orientations.


• Complete a simple symmetric figure with respect to a specific line of symmetry.



• Identify 3-D shapes, including cubes and other cuboids, from 2-D representations.


• Know angles are measured in degrees: estimate and compare acute, obtuse and reflex angles.


• Draw given angles, and measure them in degrees (°).


• Identify:


• Angles at a point and one whole turn (total 360°).


• Angles at a point on a straight line and a turn (total 180°).


• Other multiples of 90°.


• Use the properties of rectangles to deduce related facts and find missing lengths and angles.


• Distinguish between regular and irregular polygons based on reasoning about equal sides and angles.


• Draw 2-D shapes using given dimensions and angles.


• Recognise, describe and build simple 3-D shapes, including making nets.


• Compare and classify geometric shapes based on their properties and sizes and find unknown angles in any triangles, quadrilaterals, and regular polygons.


• Illustrate and name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference and know that the diameter is twice the radius.


• Recognise angles where they meet at a point, are on a straight line, or are vertically opposite and find missing angles.



Describe position, direction and movement
 


 

• Describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three-quarter turns.


• Order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences.


• Use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise).



• Recognise angles as a property of shape and as an amount of rotation.


• Identify right angles, recognise that 2 right angles make a half turn and 4 make a whole turn.


• Identify angles that are greater than a right angle.


• Describe positions on a 2-D grid as coordinates in the first quadrant.


• Describe movements between positions as translations of a given unit to the left/right and up/down.


• Plot specified points and draw sides to complete a given polygon.



• Identify, describe and represent the position of a shape following a reflection or translation, using the appropriate language, and know that the shape has not changed.


• Describe positions on the full coordinate grid. (all four quadrants)


• Draw and translate simple shapes on the coordinate plane, and reflect them in the axes.



Use measures
 


 

• Compare, describe and solve practical problems for:


•lengths and heights


•mass/weight


•capacity and volume


•time.


• Measure and begin to record:


•lengths and heights


•mass/weight


•capacity and volume


•time (hours, minutes, seconds).


• Recognise and know the value of different denominations of coins and notes.


• Sequence events in chronological order using language.


• Recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years.


• Tell the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.


• Use standard units to estimate and measure length/height (m/cm); mass (kg/g); temperature (°C); capacity (litres/ml) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers, scales, thermometers and measuring vessels.


• Compare and order lengths, mass, volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and =.


• Recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value.


• Find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money.


• Solve simple problems in a practical context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change.


• Compare and sequence intervals of time.


• Tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.


• Know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day.



• Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm); mass (kg/g); volume/capacity (l/ml).


• Measure the perimeter of simple 2-D shapes.


• Add and subtract amounts of money to give change. (£ and p)


• Tell and write the time from an analogue clock, including using Roman numerals from I to XII, and 12-hour and 24-hour clocks.


• Estimate and read time with increasing accuracy to the nearest minute; record and compare time in terms of seconds, minutes and hours; use appropriate vocabulary.


• Know the number of seconds in a minute and the number of days in each month, year and leap year.


• Compare durations of events.


• Convert between different units of measure. (for example, kilometre to metre; hour to minute)


• Measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure (including squares) in centimetres and metres.


• Find the area of rectilinear shapes by counting squares.


• Estimate, compare and calculate different measures, including money in pounds and pence.


• Read, write and convert time between analogue and digital 12- and 24-hour clocks.


• Solve problems involving converting from hours to minutes; minutes to seconds; years to months; weeks to days.



• Convert between different units of metric measure.


• Understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints.


• Measure and calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in centimetres and metres.


• Calculate and compare the area of rectangles (including squares), and including using standard units, square centimetres (cm2) and square metres (m2) and estimate the area of irregular shapes.


• Estimate volume and capacity.


• Solve problems involving converting between units of time.


• Use all four operations to solve problems involving measure (for example, length, mass, volume, money) using decimal notation, including scaling.


• Solve problems involving the calculation and conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation up to three decimal places where appropriate.


• Use, read, write and convert between standard units, converting measurements of length, mass, volume and time from a smaller unit of measure to a larger unit, and vice versa, using decimal notation up to three decimal places.


• Convert between miles and kilometres.


• Recognise that shapes with the same areas can have different perimeters and vice versa.


• Recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area and volume of shapes.


• Calculate the area of parallelograms and triangles.


• Calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units, including cubic centimetres (cm3) and cubic metres (m3), and extending to other units.



Use statistics
This concept involves interpreting, manipulating and presenting data in various ways.


 

• Interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables.


• Ask and answer simple questions by counting the number of objects in each category and sorting the categories by quantity.


• Ask and answer questions about totalling and comparing categorical data.



• Interpret and present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.


• Solve one-step and two-step questions (for example, ‘How many more?’ and ‘How many fewer?’) using information presented in scaled bar charts, pictograms and tables.


• Interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.


• Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and other graphs.



• Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line graph.


• Complete, read and interpret information in tables, including timetables.


• Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems.


• Calculate and interpret the mean as an average.



Use algebra


 

• Solve addition and subtraction problems involving missing numbers.



• Solve addition and subtraction, multiplication and division problems that involve missing numbers.



• Use simple formulae.


• Generate and describe linear number sequences.


• Express missing number problems algebraically.


• Find pairs of numbers that satisfy an equation with two unknowns.


• Enumerate possibilities of combinations of two variables.




KEY INSTANT RECALL FACTS (KIRFS)


Below is the overview of KIRFS delivery for each year group, for each half-term.



 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.

Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Mathematician:



  • Chief Test Pilot

  • Automotive Engineer

  • Astronaut

  • Land Surveyor 


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Mathematical skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'I enjoy using TT Rockstars because it's helped me to improve my times tables recall.' Y5 PUPIL


'We use White Rose Maths because it moves my learning on in little steps and this helps me to learn better. Numbots is a part of White Rose and is an engaging and fun way to recap our Maths.' Y5 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Classrooms have Maths learning displays.

We provide our pupils with a high-quality provision in order to foster their curiosity of different cultures around the world. The teaching should enable pupils to express their ideas and thoughts in another language and to understand and respond to its speakers, both in speech and in writing. Our curriculum leaves them with firm foundations for further learning in languages and to open the door to studying and working abroad.


Characteristics of a Linguist



  • The confidence to speak with good intonation and pronunciation.

  • Fluency in reading.

  • Fluency and imagination in writing.

  • A strong awareness of the culture of the countries where the language is spoken.

  • A passion for languages and a commitment to the subject.

  • The ability to use language creatively and spontaneously.

  • An independence in their studies and the ability to draw upon a wide range of resources.


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • Read fluently

  • Write imaginatively

  • Speak confidently

  • Understand the culture of the countries in which the language is spoken


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:
















































Threshold Concept (Big Idea)



Milestone 1



Milestone 2



Milestone 3



Read fluently (SP.1)



SP.1.1.A Begin to recognise some simple Spanish words.



SP.1.2.A Recognise familiar Spanish words including numbers, colours, days and months.


SP.1.2.B Begin to use a Spanish translation dictionary to translate simple words.



SP.1.3.A Read carefully and show understanding of words, phrases and simple writing.


SP.1.3.B Broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into familiar written material, including through using a dictionary.



Write imaginatively (SP.2)



 



SP.2.2.A Write simple well-known Spanish words.



SP.2.3.A Write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly.


SP.2.3.B Describe people, places, things and actions in writing.



Speak confidently (SP.3)



SP.3.1.A Begin to build a simple Spanish vocabulary.



SP.3.2.A Engage in simple conversations where questions are asked and answered.


SP.3.2.B Increase use of Spanish vocabulary and begin to speak in simple sentences.



SP.3.3.A Engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and help.


SP.3.3.B Speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures.


SP.3.3.C Develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases.


SP.3.3.D Present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences.


SP.3.3.E Describe people, places, things and actions orally.



Listen and respond (SP.4)



SP.4.1.A Appreciate Spanish versions of well-known songs and begin to join in.


SP.4.1.B Respond to simple Spanish instructions and questions.



SP.4.2.A Join in with a range of Spanish songs and rhymes.


SP.4.2.B Respond to a range of instructions, questions and commands.



SP.4.3.A Listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding.


SP.4.3.B Explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words.


SP.4.3.C Appreciate stories, songs, poems and rhymes in the language.



Understand the culture of the countries in which the language is spoken (SP.5)



SP.5.1.A Get to know some of the features, traditions and cultures of Spain. Children to share Spanish holiday photos etc. 



SP.5.2.A Understand climate, traditions, cultures, etc of South American Spanish speaking countries.



SP.5.3.A Describe some similarities and differences between Spanish speaking countries and this country.



Grammar (SP.6)



 



SP.6.2.A Begin to use masculine, feminine and neuter forms.



SP.6.3.A Understand basic grammar, including feminine, masculine and neuter forms and the conjugation of high-frequency verbs; key features and patterns of the language; how to apply these, for instance, to build sentences; and how these differ from or are similar to English.



 


At the High Peak federation the focus is on learning Spanish.


 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Linguist:



  • Attractions manager

  • Teachers in other countries

  • Chefs 

  • Hotel managers

  • Leisure and tourism

  • International law 


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Language skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'We are currently learning Spanish fruits and other foods.' Y5 PUPIL


'I can count to 20 in Spanish.' Y2 PUPIL


'I like completing the register in different languages.' Y3 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Every year group learns Spanish.

We want children to gain a firm understanding of what music is - through listening, singing, playing, evaluating, analysing and composing across a wide variety of historical periods, styles, traditions and musical genres. We want children to develop musical curiosity, understand the importance of music in the wider community and give opportunities for children to become involved musically in a variety of contexts.


Characteristics of a Musician



  • A rapidly widening repertoire which they use to create original, imaginative, fluent and distinctive composing and performance work. 

  • A musical understanding underpinned by high levels of aural perception, internalisation and knowledge of music, including high or rapidly developing levels of technical expertise. 

  • Very good awareness and appreciation of different musical traditions and genres.

  • An excellent understanding of how musical provenance - the historical, social and cultural origins of music - contributes to the diversity of musical styles.

  • The ability to give precise written and verbal explanations, using musical terminology effectively, accurately and appropriately.

  • A passion for and commitment to a diverse range of musical activities.


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • To perform

  • To compose

  • To transcribe

  • To describe music


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:




































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Perform
 



• Take part in singing, accurately following the melody.


• Follow instructions on how and when to sing or play an instrument.


• Make and control long and short sounds, using voice and instruments.


• Imitate changes in pitch.



• Sing from memory with accurate pitch.


• Sing in tune.


• Maintain a simple part within a group.


• Pronounce words within a song clearly.


• Show control of voice.


• Play notes on an instrument with care so that they are clear.


• Perform with control and awareness of others.



• Sing or play from memory with confidence.


• Perform solos or as part of an ensemble.


• Sing or play expressively and in tune.


• Hold a part within a round.


• Sing a harmony part confidently and accurately.


• Sustain a drone or a melodic ostinato to accompany singing.


• Perform with controlled breathing (voice) and skillful playing (instrument).



Compose
 



• Create a sequence of long and short sounds.


• Clap rhythms.


• Create a mixture of different sounds (long and short, loud and quiet, high and low).


• Choose sounds to create an effect.


• Sequence sounds to create an overall effect.


• Create short, musical patterns.


• Create short, rhythmic phrases.



• Compose and perform melodic songs.


• Use sound to create abstract effects.


• Create repeated patterns with a range of instruments.


• Create accompaniments for tunes.


• Use drones as accompaniments.


• Choose, order, combine and control sounds to create an effect.


• Use digital technologies to compose pieces of music.



• Create songs with verses and a chorus.


• Create rhythmic patterns with an awareness of timbre and duration.


• Combine a variety of musical devices, including melody, rhythm and chords.


• Thoughtfully select elements for a piece in order to gain a defined effect.


• Use drones and melodic ostinati (based on the pentatonic scale).


• Convey the relationship between the lyrics and the melody.


• Use digital technologies to compose, edit and refine pieces of music.



Transcribe
 



• Use symbols to represent a composition and use them to help with a performance.



• Devise non-standard symbols to indicate when to play and rest.


• Recognise the notes EGBDF and FACE on the musical stave.


• Recognise the symbols for a minim, crotchet and semibreve and say how many beats they represent.



• Use the standard musical notation of crotchet, minim and semibreve to indicate how many beats to play.


• Read and create notes on the musical stave.


• Understand the purpose of the treble and bass clefs and use them in transcribing compositions.


• Understand and use the # (sharp) and ♭ (flat) symbols.


• Use and understand simple time signatures.



Describe music
 



• Identify the beat of a tune.


• Recognise changes in timbre, dynamics and pitch.



• Use the terms: duration, timbre, pitch, beat, tempo, texture and use of silence to describe music.


• Evaluate music using musical vocabulary to identify areas of likes and dislikes.


• Understand layers of sounds and discuss their effect on mood and feelings.



• Choose from a wide range of musical vocabulary to accurately describe and appraise music including: 


    • pitch 


    • dynamics 


    • tempo 


    • timbre 


    • texture 


    • lyrics and melody 


    • sense of occasion 


    • expressive 


    • solo


    • rounds


    • harmonies


    • accompaniments


    • drones


    • cyclic patterns


    • combination of musical elements


    • cultural context.


• Describe how lyrics often reflect the cultural context of music and have social meaning.



 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Musician:



  • Theatre performer

  • Songwriter

  • Casting director

  • RAF Musician

  • Performer 


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Music skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.  


 


Pupil Voice


'We enjoy learning our Young Voices songs - especially the Muppet Medley. The concerts are great.' Y5 PUPIL


'We have a chance to learn different instruments such as ukele, recorders and flutes. We can choose other instruments to learn with visiting instructors too.' Y5 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Performing at Bridgewater Hall.




Weekly instrument lessons.

We want our children to become independent, responsible and healthy members of society. They will develop the confidence and skills to tackle the moral, social and cultural issues that are part of growing up and learn about their rights and responsibilities as part of a diverse and inclusive community. They will develop the tools to keep themselves safe and recognise how to care for their emotional and physical needs. They will understand how their body will change as they grow and how best to form positive relationships.



At The High Peak Federation, our planned curriculum programme of learning opportunities and experiences, specifically promotes children’s personal, social and health development and helps them to grow as individuals and as members of families and communities. PSHE equips children and young people with knowledge and practical skills to live healthy, safe, fulfilled and responsible lives, both now and in the future. Through the explicit teaching of mental and emotional health, we promote pupils’ wellbeing through an understanding of their own and others’ emotions and the development of healthy coping strategies. It also contributes to safeguarding, providing pupils with knowledge, understanding and strategies to keep themselves healthy and safe, as well as equipping them to support others who are facing challenges.


PSHE also enables them to reflect on and clarify both their own and British values and attitudes, and explore the complex and sometimes conflicting range of attitudes and values they encounter now and in the future.


 


Characteristics of a child growing up as a successful citizen in modern Britain.



  • Be able to demonstrate that they recognise their own worth and that of others, and identify positive ways to face new challenges.

  • The ability to express their views confidently, and listen to and show respect for the views of others.

  • The ability to make choices about how to develop healthy lifestyles.

  • The ability to identify some factors that affect emotional health and well-being.

  • Ability to identify different types of relationships and show ways to maintain good relationships.

  • Research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems and events.

  • Understand why and how rules are made and enforced, why different rules are needed in different situations and take part in making and changing rules.

  • Demonstrate respect and tolerance towards others, and resolve differences by looking at alternatives, making decisions and explaining choices

  • Shown an appreciation of the diversity of religious, and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and describe some of the different beliefs and values in society.

  • Be able to articulate the meaning of the British Values and how these support harmony within their own and wider communities.


 


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • Caring friendships

  • Families and people who care for me

  • Respectful relationships

  • Being Safe

  • Mental wellbeing

  • Internet Safety and online harm

  • Online relationships

  • Physical health and fitness

  • Healthy eating

  • Drugs, alcohol and tobacco

  • Health and prevention

  • Basic First aid

  • Changing bodies

  • Being a good citizen


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language.


 






























Threshold Concept (Big Idea)



Milestone 1



Milestone 2



Milestone 3



Health and wellbeing (PSHE.1)



PSHE.1.1.A Exploring the importance of physical, mental and emotional health.


PSHE.1.1.B Communicating feelings to others.


PSHE.1.1.C Exploring what a healthy lifestyle means.


PSHE.1.1.D Identifying the benefits of a healthy lifestyle.


PSHE.1.1.E  Identifying ways of keeping healthy.


PSHE.1.1.F Recognising what they like and dislike.


PSHE.1.1.G Exploring how to make informed choices.


PSHE.1.1.H Recognising that choices can have good and not so good consequences.


PSHE.1.1.I Setting simple goals.


PSHE.1.1.J Developing simple strategies for managing feelings.


PSHE.1.1.K Using words to describe a range of feelings.


PSHE.1.1.L Exploring what change means.


PSHE.1.1.M Exploring loss and change and the associated feelings.


PSHE.1.1.N Recognising the importance of personal hygiene.


PSHE.1.1.0 Developing simple skills to help prevent diseases spreading.


PSHE.1.1.P The process of growing from young to old.


PSHE.1.1.Q Exploring growing and changing and becoming independent.


 PSHE.1.1.R The correct names for the main parts of the body (including external genitalia).


 PSHE.1.1.S  Understanding the role of drugs as medicines.


 PSHE.1.1.T  Identifying alternatives to taking medicines.


PSHE.1.1.U Identifying that household products, including medicines, can be harmful if not used properly.


PSHE.1.1.V Identifying rules for and ways of keeping safe.


PSHE.1.1.W Recognising they have a shared responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe.


PSHE.1.1.X Identifying people who they can ask for help and think about how they might do that.


PSHE.1.1.Y  Identifying ways of keeping safe and knowing they do not keep secrets.


PSHE.1.1.Z About privacy in different contexts.


PSHE.1.1.AA About respecting the needs of ourselves and other people.


PSHE.1.1.BB Exploring the changes of growing from young to old.


PSHE.1.1.CC Identifying strategies and where to go for help.


PSHE.1.1.DD Identifying household products are hazards if not used properly.


PSHE.1.1.EE Exploring rules for and ways of keeping safe in a range of situations.


PSHE.1.1.FF Knowing who to go to if they are worried.


PSHE.1.1.GG Recognising that they share a responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe.


PSHE.1.1.HH Exploring what is ‘privacy’; their right to keep things private and the importance of respecting others’ privacy


PSHE.1.1.II Managing change positively.



PSHE.1.2.A Exploring what affects their physical, mental and emotional health.


PSHE.1.2.B  Deepening their understanding of good and not so good feelings.


PSHE.1.2.C Recognising how to make informed choices.


PSHE.1.2.D Understanding how to make informed choices.


PSHE.1.2.E Understanding the concept and benefits of a balanced healthy lifestyle.


PSHE.1.2.F  Identifying how to make informed choices.


PSHE.1.2.G Understanding what is included in a balanced diet.


PSHE.1.2.H Understanding what may influence our choices.


PSHE.1.2.I That images in the media do not always reflect reality.


PSHE.1.2.J Celebrate our strengths/qualities.


PSHE.1.2.K Setting goals.


PSHE.1.2.L Extending vocabulary to help explain the range and intensity of feelings.


PSHE.1.2.M Understanding good and not so good feelings including their range and intensity.


PSHE.1.2.N  Developing an understanding that change can cause conflicting emotions.


PSHE.1.2.O Acknowledging, exploring and identifying how to manage change positively.


PSHE.1.2.P Recognising conflicting emotions.


PSHE.1.2.Q About the kind of changes that happen in life and the associated feelings.


PSHE.1.2.R Exploring changes


PSHE.1.2.S Understanding that people have different attitudes to risk.


PSHE.1.2.T  Recognising, predicting and assessing risks in different situations.


PSHE.1.2.U Exploring how to recognise, predict and assess risks in different situations.


PSHE.1.2.V Understanding that increased independence brings increased responsibility to keep themselves safe.


PSHE.1.2.W That simple hygiene routine can prevent the spread of bacteria.


PSHE.1.2.X Knowing where to go for help and how to ask for help.


PSHE.1.2.Y Where to get help and how to ask for help.


PSHE.1.2.Z Understanding how rules can keep them safe.


PSHE.1.2.AA Identifying where and how to get help.


PSHE.1.2.BB Distinguishing between safe and harmful and to know some substances can be harmful if misused.


PSHE.1.2.CC About the changes that happen as they grow up.


PSHE.1.2.DD The right to protect our bodies.


PSHE.1.2.EE Learning rules about staying safe.


PSHE.1.2.FF Developing strategies for keeping physically and emotionally safe in different situations.


PSHE.1.2.GG Understanding the importance of protecting information particularly online.


PSHE.1.2.HH Understanding how to become digitally responsible.



PSHE.1.3.A Exploring what affects their physical, mental and emotional health.


PSHE.1.3.B Understanding the concept and benefits of a balanced healthy lifestyle.


PSHE.1.3.C Understanding how to make informed choices.


PSHE.1.3.D Exploring how we make choices about the food we eat.


PSHE.1.3.E Identifying how to make informed choices.


PSHE.1.3.F Developing skills to make their own choices.


PSHE.1.3.G Recognising how images in the media do not always reflect reality.


PSHE.1.3.H Knowing how to make informed choices.


PSHE.1.3.I Exploring how images in the media and online do not always reflect reality


PSHE.1.3.J Setting simple but challenging goals


PSHE.1.3.K Extending emotional vocabulary.


PSHE.1.3.L Exploring the intensity and range of feelings.


PSHE.1.3.M Deepening their understanding of good and not so good feelings.


PSHE.1.3.N Identify the intensity of feelings.


PSHE.1.3.O Explaining intensity of feelings.


PSHE.1.3.P Exploring and managing the difficult emotions.


PSHE.1.3.Q Acknowledging and managing change positively.


PSHE.1.3.R Recognising conflicting feelings.


PSHE.1.3.S Recognising when they experience conflicting emotions and how to manage these.


PSHE.1.3.T Managing transition to secondary school.


PSHE.1.3.U Exploring and managing loss, separation, divorce and bereavement.


PSHE.1.3.V Exploring how to recognise, predict and assess risks in different situations.


PSHE.1.3.W Understanding that increased independence brings increased


PSHE.1.3.X That simple hygiene routine can prevent the spread of bacteria.


PSHE.1.3.Y Identify pressures and influences.


PSHE.1.3.Z Identifying influences and when an influence becomes a pressure.


PSHE.1.3.AA Developing skills of how to ask for help.


PSHE.1.3.BB Practising asking for help and knowing where to go for help.


PSHE.1.3.CC Identify basic emergency procedures.


PSHE.1.3.DD Explaining how rules can keep them safe.


PSHE.1.3.EE Identifying where and how to get help.


PSHE.1.3.FF Identifying a range of drugs/substances and assessing some of the risks/effects.


PSHE.1.3.GG Exploring what is meant by the term habit and why habits can be hard to change.


PSHE.1.3.HH Understanding the term 'habit' and why habits can be hard to change.


PSHE.1.3.II Understanding changes that happen at puberty.


PSHE.1.3.JJ Understanding what puberty and human reproduction is.


PSHE.1.3.KK Developing strategies for keeping physically and emotionally safe in different situations.


PSHE.1.3.LL Understanding the importance of protecting information particularly online.


PSHE.1.3.MM Understanding how to become digitally responsible.



Relationships (PSHE.2)



PSHE.2.1.A Recognising a range of feelings in ourselves and other people.


PSHE.2.1.B Recognising how others show feelings and how to respond.


PSHE.2.1.C Recognising that their behaviour can affect others.


PSHE.2.1.D Identifying ways of keeping safe and knowing they do not keep secrets


PSHE.2.1.E Recognise what is fair/unfair, right/wrong, kind/unkind.


PSHE.2.1.F Sharing opinions on things that matter using discussions.


PSHE.2.1.G Identifying and respecting the differences and similarities between people.


PSHE.2.1.H Listen to other people and play and work cooperatively (including strategies to resolve simple arguments through negotiation).


PSHE.2.1.I Listening to others and working cooperatively.


PSHE.2.1.J Offer constructive support to others.


PSHE.2.1.K Identifying similarities and difference.


PSHE.2.1.L Identifying their special people (family, friends, carers) and how they should care for each other.


PSHE.2.1.M Identify what makes them special.


PSHE.2.1.N What physical contact is acceptable.


PSHE.2.1.O Identifying that people’s bodies can be hurt.


PSHE.2.1.P Recognising when people are being unkind to them or others, who to tell and what to say.


PSHE.2.1.Q Identifying different types of teasing and bullying, to identify that these are wrong and unacceptable.


PSHE.2.1.R Identifying strategies to resist teasing/ bullying if experienced or witnessed.



PSHE.2.2.A Recognising a wide range of emotions in themselves and others.


 PSHE.2.2.B Responding appropriately to a range of emotions in themselves and others.


PSHE.2.2.C Recognising what constitutes a healthy relationship and develop the skills to form positive and healthy relationships.


PSHE.2.2.D Recognising ways in which a relationship can be unhealthy and whom to talk to if they need support.


PSHE.2.2.E Recognising different types of relationship.


PSHE.2.2.F About differences and similarities between people, but understand everyone is equal.


PSHE.2.2.G Understanding that actions affect themselves and others.


PSHE.2.2.H About the difference between acceptable and unacceptable physical contact.


PSHE.2.2.I Understanding when it is right to ‘break a confidence’ or ‘share a secret’.


PSHE.2.2.J Listening and responding respectfully.


PSHE.2.2.K Identifying strategies to manage emotions.


PSHE.2.2.L Developing strategies to resolve disputes.


PSHE.2.2.M Knowing the names of the body parts.


PSHE.2.2.N Listen and respond respectfully.


PSHE.2.2.O Identifying how to listen and respond respectfully to a wide range of people.


PSHE.2.2.P Identifying the importance of working towards shared goals.


PSHE.2.2.Q Developing strategies for getting support for themselves or for others at risk.


PSHE.2.2.R Identifying that differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors.


PSHE.2.2.S Recognising the differences and similarities between people, but understand everyone is equal.


PSHE.2.2.T Identifying that differences and similarities arise from a number of factors.


PSHE.2.2.U Recognising the nature and consequences of discrimination.


PSHE.2.2.V Understanding the nature and consequences of discrimination, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviour (including cyberbullying, prejudice-based language, ‘trolling’).


PSHE.2.2.W Recognise and challenge stereotypes.


PSHE.2.2.X Knowing how to recognise bullying and abuse in all its forms.


PSHE.2.2.Y Understanding personal boundaries.



PSHE.2.3.A Recognising a        wider range of feelings in  others and how to respond  appropriately.


PSHE.2.3.B Recognising what a healthy relationship is.


PSHE.2.3.C Identifying qualities of a healthy relationship


PSHE.2.3.D Recognising ways in which a relationship can be unhealthy and whom to talk to if they need support.


PSHE.2.3.E Recognising different types of relationship, including those between acquaintances, friends, relatives and families.


PSHE.2.3.F Understanding the true meaning behind civil partnerships and marriage.


PSHE.2.3.G About committed loving relationships.


PSHE.2.3.H Understanding that their actions affect themselves and others.


PSHE.2.3.I Recognising that their actions can affect themselves and others.


PSHE.2.3.J Identifying how to listen and respond respectfully to a wide range of people.


PSHE.2.3.K Developing strategies to resolve disputes


PSHE.2.3.L Developing strategies for getting support for themselves or for others at risk.


PSHE.2.3.M Resolving conflicts.


PSHE.2.3.N About differences and similarities between people, but understand everyone is equal.


PSHE.2.3.O Identifying that differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors.


PSHE.2.3.P Recognising the factors that make people the same or different.


PSHE.2.3.Q Recognising the nature and consequences of discrimination.


PSHE.2.3.R Understanding the nature and consequences of discrimination, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviour (including cyberbullying, prejudice based language, ‘trolling’).


PSHE.2.3.S Recognising and challenging stereotypes.


PSHE.2.3.T Knowing how to recognise bullying and abuse in all its forms.


PSHE.2.3.U Understanding the correct use of the terms sex, gender identity and sexual orientation.


PSHE.2.3.V Recognising that forcing anyone to marry is a crime.


PSHE.2.3.W Understanding about confidentiality and about times when it is necessary to break a confidence.



Living in the wider world (PSHE.3)



PSHE.3.1.A Identify how they can contribute to the life of the classroom and school.


PSHE.3.1.B Understanding why rules are important in keeping us safe.


PSHE.3.1.C Construct and explore the importance of rules.


PSHE.3.1.D Explore and understand that everyone has rights and responsibilities.


PSHE.3.1.E Recognise they belong to different groups and communities such as family and school.


PSHE.3.1.F Understanding that they belong to different groups.


PSHE.3.1.G Identify what improves and harms their environments.


PSHE.3.1.H Recognising what money looks like.


PSHE.3.1.I Identifying how money is obtained.


PSHE.3.1.J Understanding the ways money can be used.


PSHE.3.1.K Understanding how to keep money safe and what influences choices.


PSHE.3.1.L Explore ways in which they are all unique.


PSHE.3.1.M Identifying ways in which they are unique.


PSHE.3.1.N That everybody is unique.


PSHE.3.1.O Identify ways in which we are the same as all other people; what we have in common with everyone else.


PSHE.3.1.P Identifying people who work in the community and how to ask for help.



PSHE.3.2.A Research, discuss and debate topical issues.


PSHE.3.2.B Identify why rules are needed in different situations.


PSHE.3.2.C Understanding that there are human rights to protect everyone.


PSHE.3.2.D Explore rights and responsibilities, rights and duties at home, school, community and the environment.


PSHE.3.2.E Develop skills to carry out responsibilities.


PSHE.3.2.F Exploring different kinds of responsibilities at school and in the community.


PSHE.3.2.G Explore how to resolve differences and respect others’ points of view.


PSHE.3.2.H Identifying what being part of a community means.


 PSHE.3.2.I Explore what being part of a community means and how they belong.


PSHE.3.2.J Identify the role of voluntary and charity groups.


PSHE.3.2.K Appreciate the range of identities in the UK.


      PSHE.3.2.L Understanding   


      different values and customs.


      PSHE.3.2.M Exploring how to


      manage money.


  PSHE.3.2.N Explaining the  


  importance of money in


  people’s lives and how money


  is obtained.


      PSHE.3.2.O Understanding the


      concepts of interest, loan,


      debt and tax.


  PSHE.3.2.P Understanding


  enterprise and begin to


  develop enterprise skills.


 PSHE.3.2.Q Understanding    the nature and consequences  of discrimination, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviour (including cyberbullying, prejudice-based language, ‘trolling’).


 


 


 



PSHE.3.3.A Research, discuss and debate topical issues.


PSHE.3.3.B Debate topical issues.


PSHE.3.3.C Identify why rules are needed in different situations.


PSHE.3.3.D Understanding that there are human rights to protect everyone.


 PSHE.3.3.E To understand there are some cultural practices against British law.


PSHE.3.3.F Explore rights and responsibilities at home, school, community and the environment.


PSHE.3.3.G Develop skills to carry out responsibilities.


PSHE.3.3.H Exploring different kinds of responsibilities at school and in the community.


PSHE.3.3.I Explore others’ points of view.


PSHE.3.3.J Explore what being part of a community means and how they belong.


PSHE.3.3.K Understand how finance plays an important part in people’s lives.


PSHE.3.3.L Understanding about being a critical consumer.


PSHE.3.3.M Developing an understanding of the concepts of interest, loan, debt and tax.


PSHE.3.3.N Identifying how resources are allocated and the effects on individuals, communities and the environment.


PSHE.3.3.O Recognising and managing dares.


PSHE.3.3.P Developing enterprise skills.


PSHE.3.3.Q Critiquing how social media presents information.


 



 


We follow the scheme PSHE Matters.


 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs.


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future:



  • Guide Dog Trainer

  • Rehoming Assistant

  • Kit Manager

  • Attractions Manager


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


 



Support with RSE




RSE is part of our PHSE Curriculum – what is the meaning of RSE?


RSE stands for “Relationships and Sex Education” and as part of Relationships and Health Education, is a new approach to teaching children about relationships and health.


The new Relationships and Health Education curriculum is designed to:



  • Help all children grow up healthy, happy and safe.

  • Give all children the knowledge to make informed decisions about their wellbeing, health and relationships.

  • Support all children to manage the challenges and opportunities of modern Britain.

  • Prepare all children for a successful adult lives.


By the time a child finishes primary school, they will have been taught about the following in Relationships Education:



  • Family and people who care for them.

  • Caring friendships.

  • Respectful relationships.

  • Online relationships.

  • Being safe.


Here are some resources to support Parents and Carers with RSE discussions at home:


Talking to your child about Relationship Education – A Guide for Parents and Carers


RSE – Useful Resources to Support Discussion


RSE – Frequently Asked Questions and Answers


Relationships Education and Online Safety – A Guide for Parents and Carers


All About Puberty – A Guide for Parents and Carers


 



Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the PSHE skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'It is an important part of our learning - we sometimes learn PHSE without even realising it! It gives us a better understanding and appreciation of others and helps me to understand and then talk to someone about my own feelings.' Y5 PUPIL


'We have been finding out about managing money and that is really interesting.' Y3 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



NSPCC visit.




Finding out about how to improve well-being through exercise.




Y6 children leading an Assembly with a focus on Inclusivity.




We deliver consistently high quality phonics learning, but will soon be introducing our new Phonics scheme - Essential Letters and Sounds.

What is Essential Letters and Sounds?

Essential Letters and Sounds is a Systematic Synthetic Phonics (SSP) programme, validated by the Department for Education.









By distilling Letters and Sounds to its purest form, – its essence – it ensures every phonics lesson is taught to the highest standard. Essential Letters and Sounds is an SSP where only the essential elements are included.


The name reflects the key principles of the programme; simplicity and consistency.


Essential Letters and Sounds… 



  • combines continuous and reactive assessment

  • provides robust intervention

  • is rigorous and engaging

  • supports teachers to ensure the lowest attaining children keep up rather than catch up

  • aligns with books from Oxford University Press

  • provides immediate, in the lesson intervention

  • provides whole school training, accessible at times that suit your school timetable

  • supports Reading and Phonics Leads

  • training subscription includes an assessment tracker and analysis dashboard







Pupil Voice


'We learn our phonics every day and it is lots of fun.' Y2 PUPIL


'I like Phonics because I love learning about digraphs' REC PUPIL


'I like reading by sounding the words out and blending them, using robot arms' Y1 PUPIL


Examples of Learning




Children receive lots of support with their Phonics development.




Phonics learning is often in small groups with differentiated support.

Our delivery of high quality PE, alongside the use of specialist coaches, enables children to develop their physical fitness, stamina and understanding of their body during exercise. This encourages them to be physically confident and develop a healthy lifestyle. Opportunities for pupils to compete in sport enables children to build character and feel a sense of personal success in an atmosphere of healthy competition.


Characteristics of an Athlete



  • The ability to acquire new knowledge and skills exceptionally well and develop an in-depth understanding of PE.

  • The willingness to practise skills in a wide range of different activities and situations, alone, in small groups and in teams and to apply these skills in chosen activities to achieve exceptionally high levels of performance.

  • High levels of physical fitness.

  • A healthy lifestyle, achieved by eating sensibly, avoiding smoking, drugs and alcohol and exercising regularly.

  • The ability to remain physically active for sustained periods of time and an understanding of the importance of this in promoting long-term health and well-being. 

  • The ability to take the initiative and become excellent young leaders, organising and officiating, and evaluating what needs to be done to improve, and motivating and instilling excellent sporting attitudes in others. 

  • Exceptional levels of originality, imagination and creativity in their techniques, tactics and choreography, knowledge of how to improve their own and others’ performance and the ability to work independently for extended periods of time without the need of guidance or support.

  • A keen interest in PE. A willingness to participate eagerly in every lesson, highly positive attitudes and the ability to make informed choices about engaging fully in extra-curricular sport.

  • The ability to swim at least 25 metres before the end of Year 6 and knowledge of how to remain safe in and around water. 


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • To develop practical skills in order to participate, compete and lead a healthy lifestyle


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:


















































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



 



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Develop practical skills in order to participate, compete and lead a healthy lifestyle
 



Games



• Use the terms ‘opponent’ and ‘team-mate’.


• Use rolling, hitting, running, jumping, catching and kicking skills in combination.


• Develop tactics.


• Lead others when appropriate.



• Throw and catch with control and accuracy.


• Strike a ball and field with control.


• Choose appropriate tactics to cause problems for the opposition.


• Follow the rules of the game and play fairly.


• Maintain possession of a ball (with, e.g. feet, a hockey stick or hands).


• Pass to team mates at appropriate times.


• Lead others and act as a respectful team member.



• Choose and combine techniques in game situations (running, throwing, catching, passing, jumping and kicking, etc.).


• Work alone, or with team mates in order to gain points or possession.


• Strike a bowled or volleyed ball with accuracy.


• Use forehand and backhand when playing racket games.


• Field, defend and attack tactically by anticipating the direction of play.


• Choose the most appropriate tactics for a game.


• Uphold the spirit of fair play and respect in all competitive situations.


• Lead others when called upon and act as a good role model within a team.



Dance



• Copy and remember moves and positions.


• Move with careful control and coordination.


• Link two or more actions to perform a sequence.


• Choose movements to communicate a mood, feeling or idea.



• Plan, perform and repeat sequences.


• Move in a clear, fluent and expressive manner.


• Refine movements into sequences.


• Create dances and movements that convey a definite idea.


• Change speed and levels within a performance. 


• Develop physical strength and suppleness by practising moves and stretching.



• Compose creative and imaginative dance sequences.


• Perform expressively and hold a precise and strong body posture.


• Perform and create complex sequences.


• Express an idea in original and imaginative ways.


• Plan to perform with high energy, slow grace or other themes and maintain this throughout a piece. 


• Perform complex moves that combine strength and stamina gained through gymnastics activities (such as cartwheels or handstands).



Gymnastics



• Copy and remember actions.


• Move with some control and awareness of space.


• Link two or more actions to make a sequence.


• Show contrasts (such as small/tall, straight/curved and wide/narrow).


• Travel by rolling forwards, backwards and sideways. 


• Hold a position whilst balancing on different points of the body.


• Climb safely on equipment.


• Stretch and curl to develop flexibility.


• Jump in a variety of ways and land with increasing control and balance.



• Plan, perform and repeat sequences.


• Move in a clear, fluent and expressive manner.


• Refine movements into sequences.


• Show changes of direction, speed and level during a performance.


• Travel in a variety of ways, including flight, by transferring weight to generate power in movements.


• Show a kinesthetic sense in order to improve the placement and alignment of body parts (e.g. in balances experiment to find out how to get the centre of gravity successfully over base and organise body parts to create an interesting body shape).


• Swing and hang from equipment safely (using hands).



• Create complex and well-executed sequences that include a full range of movements including: 


    • travelling 


    • balances 


    • swinging 


    • springing 


    • flight 


    • vaults 


    • inversions 


    • rotations 


    • bending, stretching and twisting 


    • gestures 


    • linking skills.


•Hold shapes that are strong, fluent and expressive.


• Include in a sequence set pieces, choosing the most appropriate linking elements.


• Vary speed, direction, level and body rotation during floor performances.


• Practise and refine the gymnastic techniques used in performances (listed above).


• Demonstrate good kinesthetic awareness (placement and alignment of body parts is usually good in well-rehearsed actions).


• Use equipment to vault and to swing (remaining upright).



Swimming



• Swim unaided up to 25 metres.


• Use one basic stroke, breathing correctly.


• Control leg movements. 



• Swim between 25 and 50 metres unaided.


• Use more than one stroke and coordinate breathing as appropriate for the stroke being used.


• Coordinate leg and arm movements.


• Swim at the surface and below the water.



• Swim over 100 metres unaided.


• Use breast stroke, front crawl and back stroke, ensuring that breathing is correct so as not to interrupt the pattern of swimming.


• Swim fluently with controlled strokes.


• Turn efficiently at the end of a length.



Athletics



• Athletic activities are combined with games in Years 1 and 2. 



• Sprint over a short distance up to 60 metres.


• Run over a longer distance, conserving 


energy in order to sustain performance.


• Use a range of throwing techniques (such as under arm, over arm).


• Throw with accuracy to hit a target or cover a distance.


• Jump in a number of ways, using a run up where appropriate.


• Compete with others and aim to improve personal best performances. 



• Combine sprinting with low hurdles over 60 metres.


• Choose the best place for running over a variety of distances.


• Throw accurately and refine performance by analysing technique and body shape.


• Show control in take off and landings when jumping.


• Compete with others and keep track of personal best performances, setting targets for improvement.



Outdoor and adventurous activities



• Not applicable.



• Arrive properly equipped for outdoor and adventurous activity.


• Understand the need to show accomplishment in managing risks.


• Show an ability to both lead and form part of a team.


• Support others and seek support if required when the situation dictates.


• Show resilience when plans do not work and initiative to try new ways of working.


• Use maps, compasses and digital devices to orientate themselves.


• Remain aware of changing conditions and change plans if necessary. 



• Select appropriate equipment for outdoor and adventurous activity.


• Identify possible risks and ways to manage them, asking for and listening carefully to expert advice.


• Embrace both leadership and team roles and gain the commitment and respect of a team.


• Empathise with others and offer support without being asked. Seek support from the team and the experts if in any doubt.


• Remain positive even in the most challenging circumstances, rallying others if need be. 


• Use a range of devices in order to orientate themselves. 


• Quickly assess changing conditions and adapt plans to ensure safety comes first.



We follow the Peak Active Sports (qualified coaches) scheme of work for Games, Outdoor and Adventurous Activities and Athletics. We follow the Val Sabin schemes of work for Dance and Gymnastics. We deliver the Swimming scheme of work through lessons with qualified swimming instructors arranged through DCC.


 


Aspirations for the Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs. Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as an Athlete. :




  • Physiotherapist



  • Coach

  • Rock climbing instructor

  • Kit manager


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the PE skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'I enjoy playing sports like Dodgeball and warm up games like 'Shark Attack' and 'Popcorn'. Our Peak Active Sports coach is really kind. Y5 PUPIL


'PE is fun because we do lots of different activities every week and we can sometimes make our own decisions about what we play.' Y5 PUPIL


'We have weekly swimming lessons and this helps us to improve and leave school as good swimmers.' Y5 PUPIL


'I liked going to the Boccia event at New Mills Leisure Centre with my friends - we did really well.' Y5 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Quadkids Athletics in New Mills.




Developing our Cheerleading routine.




Residential experiences with lots of Outdoor and Adventurous Activities.




Bikeability training.






Enjoying an afternoon of PE.


Our curriculum is an enquiry based model which develops children's critical thinking skills, motivation to learn and knowledge and understanding of different religions, cultures and their beliefs. Our approach is based upon the philosophy that children are free to make their own choices and decisions regarding religion and beliefs. Through the RE curriculum, we also aim to foster an awareness of British values, tolerance of others and knowledge of our own society and the wider world.


Characteristics of a Religious Scholar



  • An outstanding level of religious understanding and knowledge.

  • A thorough engagement with a range of ultimate questions about the meaning and significance of existence.

  • The ability to ask significant and highly reflective questions about religion and demonstrate an excellent understanding of issues related to the nature, truth and value of religion.

  • A strong understanding of how the beliefs, values, practices and ways of life within any religion cohere together.

  • Exceptional independence; the ability to think for themselves and take the initiative in, for example, asking questions, carrying out investigations, evaluating ideas and working constructively with others.

  • Significant levels of originality, imagination or creativity, which are shown in their responses to their learning in RE.

  • The ability to link the study of religion and belief to personal reflections on meaning and purpose.

  • A wide knowledge and deep understanding across a wide range of religions and beliefs. 


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:



  • Understand beliefs and teachings

  • Understand practices and lifestyles

  • Understand how beliefs are conveyed

  • Reflect

  • Understand values


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:











































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Understand beliefs and teachings
This concept involves understanding the key teachings of various religions.



• Describe some of the teachings of a religion.


• Describe some of the main festivals or celebrations of a religion.



• Present the key teachings and beliefs of a religion.


• Refer to religious figures and holy books to explain answers.



• Explain how some teachings and beliefs are shared between religions.


• Explain how religious beliefs shape the lives of individuals and communities. 



Understand practices and lifestyles
This concept involves understanding the day to day lives and practices of various religions.



• Recognise, name and describe some religious artefacts, places and practices.



• Identify religious artefacts and explain how and why they are used.


• Describe religious buildings and explain how they are used.


• Explain some of the religious practices of both clerics and individuals.



• Explain the practices and lifestyles involved in belonging to a faith community.


• Compare and contrast the lifestyles of different faith groups and give reasons why some within the same faith may adopt different lifestyles.


• Show an understanding of the role of a spiritual leader.



Understand how beliefs are conveyed
This concept involves understanding how books, scriptures, readings and other important means of communication are used to convey beliefs.



• Name some religious symbols.


• Explain the meaning of some religious symbols.



• Identify religious symbolism in literature and the arts.



• Explain some of the different ways that individuals show their beliefs.



Reflect
This concept involves an appreciation of how religion plays an important role in the lives of some people.



• Identify the things that are important in their own lives and compare these to religious beliefs.


• Relate emotions to some of the experiences of religious figures studied.


• Ask questions about puzzling aspects of life.



• Show an understanding that personal experiences and feelings influence attitudes and actions. 


• Give some reasons why religious figures may have acted as they did.


• Ask questions that have no universally agreed answers.



• Recognise and express feelings about their own identities. Relate these to religious beliefs or teachings.


• Explain their own ideas about the answers to ultimate questions. 


• Explain why their own answers to ultimate questions may differ from those of others. 



Understand values
This concept involves an appreciation of how many people place values as an important aspect of their lives.



• Identify how they have to make their own choices in life.


• Explain how actions affect others.


• Show an understanding of the term ‘morals’.



• Explain how beliefs about right and wrong affect people’s behaviour. 


• Describe how some of the values held by communities or individuals affect behaviour and actions. 


• Discuss and give opinions on stories involving moral dilemmas.



• Explain why different religious communities or individuals may have a different view of what is right and wrong.


• Show an awareness of morals and right and wrong beyond rules (i.e. wanting to act in a certain way despite rules).


• Express their own values and remain respectful of those with different values.




 



Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs. 
 


Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Religious Scholar:



  • Vicar

  • Chaplain

  • Member of Parliament

  • Journalist

  • Advice Worker

  • Charity fundraiser

  • Youth worker


For more careers, please visit First Careers.


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of the Scholary skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'We find out about different religions, faiths and beliefs. This is to help us understand people in our own community and around the world - we know people might have different beliefs, but we're also all the same too.' Y5 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Celebrating Divali.




Nativity service.

We encourage the children to think independently and ask questions about working scientifically and be responsible for developing the knowledge and skills it brings. We want children to become confident in using a range of skills, using scientific vocabulary and conducting a range of experiment to solve problems and prove hypotheses. We give children the opportunity to be creative, innovative and use their imagination to take part in scientific experiments in school and on field trips. We also want children to develop a passion for Science and consider the potential careers it offers.


Characteristics of a Scientist



  • The ability to think independently and raise questions about working scientifically and the knowledge and skills that it brings. 

  • Confidence and competence in the full range of practical skills, taking the initiative in, for example, planning and carrying out scientific investigations. 

  • Excellent scientific knowledge and understanding which is demonstrated in written and verbal explanations, solving challenging problems and reporting scientific findings.

  • High levels of originality, imagination or innovation in the application of skills.

  • The ability to undertake practical work in a variety of contexts.

  • A passion for science and its application in past, present and future technologies.


 


Implementation


Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following Big Ideas:


Work scientifically


Biology:



  • Understand plants

  • Understand animals and humans

  • Investigate living things

  • Understand evolution and inheritance


Chemistry:



  • Investigate materials


Physics:



  • Understand movement, forces and magnets

  • Understand the Earth’s movement in space

  • Investigate light and seeing

  • Investigate sound and hearing

  • Understand electrical circuits


These key concepts underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 


The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:














































































Threshold Concept


Key Skills



Milestone 1


Years 1 and 2



Milestone 2


Years 3 and 4



Milestone 3


Years 5 and 6



Work scientifically
 




  • Ask simple questions.

  • Observe closely, using simple equipment.

  • Use observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions.

  • Identify and classify, suggesting ideas for groups.

  • Perform simple comparative tests.

  • Be able to suggest what to change and keep the same for a fair test.

  • Gather and record simple data to help in answering questions.

  • To be able to identify and verbalize skills used when completing Science Passports at the end of each topic.


 



Ask relevant questions.


• Set up simple, practical enquiries and comparative and fair tests.


• Make accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, e.g. thermometers and data loggers.


• Gather, record, classify and present data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions.


• Record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, bar charts and tables.


• Report on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions.


• Use results to draw simple conclusions and suggest improvements, new questions and predictions for setting up further tests.


• Identify differences, similarities or changes related to simple, scientific ideas and processes.


• Use straightforward, scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.



• Plan enquiries, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary.


• Use appropriate techniques, apparatus, and materials during fieldwork and laboratory work.


• Take measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision.


• Record data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, bar and line graphs, and models.


• Report findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations of results, explanations involving causal relationships, and conclusions.


• Present findings in written form, displays and other presentations.


• Use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.


• Use simple models to describe scientific ideas, identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.



Biology: Understand plants 



Identify and name a variety of common plants, including garden plants, wild plants and trees and those classified as deciduous and evergreen.


• Identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers.


• Observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants.


• Find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy.


 



• Identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem, leaves and flowers.


• Explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant.


• Investigate the way in which water is transported within plants.


• Explore the role of flowers in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.


 




  • Relate knowledge of plants to studies of evolution and inheritance.


• Relate knowledge of plants to studies of all living things


 



Biology: Understand animals and humans



Identify and name a variety of common animals that are birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals and invertebrates.


• Identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores.


• Describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals and invertebrates, including pets).


• Identify name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense.


• Notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults.


• Investigate and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air).


• Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food and hygiene.


 



• Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amounts of nutrition, that they cannot make their own food and they get nutrition from what they eat.


• Construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.


• Identify that humans and some animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.


• Describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans.


• Identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions.


 



• Describe the changes as humans develop to old age.


• Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood.


• Recognise the importance of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way the human body functions. 


• Describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans.


 



Biology: Investigate living things



• Explore and compare the differences between things that are living, that are dead and that have never been alive.


• Identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants and how they depend on each other.


• Identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including micro-habitats.


• Describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.


 



• Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways.


• Explore and use classification keys.


• Recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to specific habitats.


 



• Describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird.


• Describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals.


• Describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics.


• Give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.


 



Biology: Understand evolution and inheritance



•Identify how humans resemble their parents in many features.


 


 


 


 


 


 



• Identify how plants and animals, including humans, resemble their parents in many features.


• Recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago.


• Identify how animals and plants are suited to and adapt to their environment in different ways.


 



• Recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago.


• Recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents.


• Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.


 



Chemistry: Investigate materials



Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.


• Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water and rock.


• Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials.


• Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.


• Find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.


• Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick/rock, and paper/cardboard for particular uses.


 



Rocks and Soils


• Compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their simple, physical properties.


• Relate the simple physical properties of some rocks to their formation (igneous or sedimentary).


• Describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within sedimentary rock.


• Recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.


States of Matter


• Compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases.


• Observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°C), building on their teaching in mathematics.


• Identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature.


 



• Compare and group together everyday materials based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, including their hardness, solubility, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets.


• Understand how some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution and describe how to recover a substance from a solution.


• Use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating.


• Give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic.


• Demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes.


• Explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning, oxidisation and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda



Physics: Understand movement, forces and magnets



• Notice and describe how things move, using simple comparisons such as faster and slower.


• Compare how different things move.


 



• Compare how things move on different surfaces.


• Notice that some forces need contact between two objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance.


• Observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others.


• Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials.


• Describe magnets as having two poles.


• Predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.


 



Magnets


• Describe magnets as having two poles.


• Predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.


Forces


• Explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object.


• Identify the effect of drag forces, such as air resistance, water resistance and friction that act between moving surfaces.


• Describe, in terms of drag forces, why moving objects that are not driven tend to slow down.


• Understand that force and motion can be transferred through mechanical devices such as gears, pulleys, levers and springs.


• Understand that some mechanisms including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect.



Physics: Understand light and seeing



• Observe and name a variety of sources of light, including electric lights, flames and the Sun, explaining that we see things because light travels from them to our eyes.



• Recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light.


• Notice that light is reflected from surfaces.


• Recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes.


• Recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by a solid object.


• Find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.


 



• Understand that light appears to travel in straight lines.


• Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eyes.


• Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them, and to predict the size of shadows when the position of the light source changes. 


• Explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes.



Physics: Investigate sound and hearing



• Observe and name a variety of sources of sound, noticing that we hear with our ears.



• Identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating.


• Recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear


 



• Find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it.


• Find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it.


• Recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.



Physics: Understand electrical circuits



• Identify common appliances that run on electricity.


• Construct a simple series electrical circuit.


 



• Identify common appliances that run on electricity.


• Construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers.


• Identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is 


part of a complete loop with a battery.


• Recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit. 


• Recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors.


 



• Associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit.


• Compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches.


• Use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram.


 



Physics: Understand the Earth’s movement in space



• Observe the apparent movement of the Sun during the day.


• Observe changes across the four seasons.


• Observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies.


 



• Describe the movement of the Earth relative to the Sun in the solar system.


• Describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth.


 



• Describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system.


• Describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth.


• Describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies.


• Use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.



Note: Items in italics are not statutory in the Science National Curriculum.


 


Aspirations For The Future


Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs. Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Scientist:


  • Aquatic vet

  • Astronaut

  • Animal researcher

  • Marine biologist

  • Helicopter mission control

  • Weather presenter


For more careers, please visit First Careers and Career Stem.


 


Impact


Assessment


Through the explicit teaching of Science skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding. Our assessment systems enable teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.   


Pupil Voice


'We enjoy Science - it's lots of fun. This year we have learnt about the Human Body (teeth and digestive system), Forces and Electricity and are currently investigating Sound.' Y5 PUPIL


'We really enjoy Science experiments.' Y5 PUPIL


'We enjoyed a Science Week at school recently including a visit to Magna - which was great. We have a visiting Planetarium next week too.' Y6 PUPIL


Examples of Learning



Our Science focus for this term.




Planting and growing experiement.